DisplayCAL verification for dummies

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  • #33507

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    Forgive the title. I know that DisplayCAL is not intended for use by dummies but I’m wondering if I can get some clarity on how the “verification” function can be used to do something that I think many non-advanced users want to do. I have read through multiple other threads on a similar theme and I still don’t feel I properly understand everything. I do understand that whatever I measure is limited by the capabilities of my colorimeter. Anyway, here are two basic use cases, and my understanding of the settings to use for them:

    Use case A: I’ve done the displayCAL calibration/profiling process, and created a profile for my monitor. Now I want to check how my monitor performs, with that profile active, compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    • Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    • Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    • Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    • “Use simulation profile as display profile”: unticked
    • Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Use case B:  I want to check how my monitor performs with the default OS profile active (ie without any displayCAL callibration profile), compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    “Use simulation profile as display profile”: ticked
    Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Have I got that right?

    Here are a couple of things that confuse me:

    1. “Simulation profile” basically means the standard, or “ideal” performance, that I’m testing against. This is basically only really about tone response curves or gamma, and doesn’t have anything to do with colourspace, is that right? This confused me for a while because I didn’t understand why I’d test against a particular colourspace. Is there a reason the dialogue doesn’t say something like “simulation profile TRCs as per…” instead of just “simulation profile”. And I guess there is a technical reason it’s labelled “simulation profile” rather than something like “reference profile”, but to me the latter would make things easier to understand.
    2. The option “use simulation profile as display profile” … when I tick this, it’s just telling my computer to send a default signal to the monitor, instead of one modified by any of my custom profiles – is that right?
    3. Under “settings” at the top, what does it mean when I set it to “current”? What I expected this to mean was that instead of using a profile I’ve got selected there, it will use whatever profile I’ve got selected in my OS settings, which could be one of the ones I’ve generated via displayCAL, or it could be a default one, or it could be something else. But if I set it to “current” then it won’t let me do a verification report  (the measurement report button is greyed out). So what is the purpose of the “<Current>” option in that dropdown?

    I expect these questions will probably just reveal that there’s a whole load of stuff I don’t understand properly at all, but I thought it was worth a try!

    • This topic was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by lineweight.
    • This topic was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by lineweight.
    #33519

    Vincent
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    Forgive the title. I know that DisplayCAL is not intended for use by dummies but I’m wondering if I can get some clarity on how the “verification” function can be used to do something that I think many non-advanced users want to do. I have read through multiple other threads on a similar theme and I still don’t feel I properly understand everything. I do understand that whatever I measure is limited by the capabilities of my colorimeter. Anyway, here are two basic use cases, and my understanding of the settings to use for them:

    Use case A: I’ve done the displayCAL calibration/profiling process, and created a profile for my monitor. Now I want to check how my monitor performs, with that profile active, compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    • Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    • Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    • Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    • “Use simulation profile as display profile”: unticked
    • Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Use case B:  I want to check how my monitor performs with the default OS profile active (ie without any displayCAL callibration profile), compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    “Use simulation profile as display profile”: ticked
    Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Have I got that right?

    No, that last one verifies if monitor without calibration matches sRGB, not if using factory ICM (installed by driver, usually) your display will be able to show accurate sRGb colors in Photoshop

    “Use simulation profile as display profile”: ticked => check if display without calibration matches simulation profile.

    Here are a couple of things that confuse me:

    1. “Simulation profile” basically means the standard, or “ideal” performance, that I’m testing against. This is basically only really about tone response curves or gamma, and doesn’t have anything to do with colourspace, is that right? This confused me for a while because I didn’t understand why I’d test against a particular colourspace. Is there a reason the dialogue doesn’t say something like “simulation profile TRCs as per…” instead of just “simulation profile”. And I guess there is a technical reason it’s labelled “simulation profile” rather than something like “reference profile”, but to me the latter would make things easier to understand.
    1. Read bellow
    1. The option “use simulation profile as display profile” … when I tick this, it’s just telling my computer to send a default signal to the monitor, instead of one modified by any of my custom profiles – is that right?

    It will assign simulation profile to display in OS, hence it will test if uncalibrated display (VCGT) matches exactly that profile => non color managed apps (or maybe verify factory or HW calibration to certain targets)

    If you uncheck it you test how good display is when showing colors in an image with <simulation profile> colorspace under Photoshop. => color managed apps

    1. Under “settings” at the top, what does it mean when I set it to “current”? What I expected this to mean was that instead of using a profile I’ve got selected there, it will use whatever profile I’ve got selected in my OS settings, which could be one of the ones I’ve generated via displayCAL, or it could be a default one, or it could be something else. But if I set it to “current” then it won’t let me do a verification report  (the measurement report button is greyed out). So what is the purpose of the “<Current>” option in that dropdown?

    I can use current so perhaps you didin’t run it previousily or you are using macos or it’s a bug in displaycal.

    IMHO choosing current you shoudl be able to verify current display ICC (maybe generated with another tool, or HW calibration suite) with displaycal CCSS corrections and maths and all its features (because original software that created such ICC may be more limited)
    Pherhaps you can do that by manually installing that 3td party profile using File menu.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by Vincent.
    #33523

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    Thanks for taking the time to reply.

    Forgive the title. I know that DisplayCAL is not intended for use by dummies but I’m wondering if I can get some clarity on how the “verification” function can be used to do something that I think many non-advanced users want to do. I have read through multiple other threads on a similar theme and I still don’t feel I properly understand everything. I do understand that whatever I measure is limited by the capabilities of my colorimeter. Anyway, here are two basic use cases, and my understanding of the settings to use for them:

    Use case A: I’ve done the displayCAL calibration/profiling process, and created a profile for my monitor. Now I want to check how my monitor performs, with that profile active, compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    • Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    • Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    • Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    • “Use simulation profile as display profile”: unticked
    • Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Use case B:  I want to check how my monitor performs with the default OS profile active (ie without any displayCAL callibration profile), compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    “Use simulation profile as display profile”: ticked
    Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Have I got that right?

    No, that last one verifies if monitor without calibration matches sRGB, not if using factory ICM (installed by driver, usually) your display will be able to show accurate sRGb colors in Photoshop

    I am finding it difficult to understand this sentence.

    Firstly … is “monitor without calibration” not the same thing as “monitor using factory ICM”? (Because I had thought that if I haven’t done any calibration process, and haven’t installed any special profiles, then the monitor must be using its factory ICM or the one the OS applies to it by default)

    Secondly… when you say “matches sRGB” do you mean it matches the sRGB tone curve, or more than that?

    Here are a couple of things that confuse me:

    1. “Simulation profile” basically means the standard, or “ideal” performance, that I’m testing against. This is basically only really about tone response curves or gamma, and doesn’t have anything to do with colourspace, is that right? This confused me for a while because I didn’t understand why I’d test against a particular colourspace. Is there a reason the dialogue doesn’t say something like “simulation profile TRCs as per…” instead of just “simulation profile”. And I guess there is a technical reason it’s labelled “simulation profile” rather than something like “reference profile”, but to me the latter would make things easier to understand.
    1. Read bellow
    1. The option “use simulation profile as display profile” … when I tick this, it’s just telling my computer to send a default signal to the monitor, instead of one modified by any of my custom profiles – is that right?

    It will assign simulation profile to display in OS, hence it will test if uncalibrated display (VCGT) matches exactly that profile => non color managed apps (or maybe verify factory or HW calibration to certain targets)

    If you uncheck it you test how good display is when showing colors in an image with <simulation profile> colorspace under Photoshop. => color managed apps

    Ok, so checking this box is to do with whether I want to test what happens with colour-managed apps vs. non-colour-managed apps? But does this also apply to macos (I am using macos)?

    1. Under “settings” at the top, what does it mean when I set it to “current”? What I expected this to mean was that instead of using a profile I’ve got selected there, it will use whatever profile I’ve got selected in my OS settings, which could be one of the ones I’ve generated via displayCAL, or it could be a default one, or it could be something else. But if I set it to “current” then it won’t let me do a verification report  (the measurement report button is greyed out). So what is the purpose of the “<Current>” option in that dropdown?

    I can use current so perhaps you didin’t run it previousily or you are using macos or it’s a bug in displaycal.

    IMHO choosing current you shoudl be able to verify current display ICC (maybe generated with another tool, or HW calibration suite) with displaycal CCSS corrections and maths and all its features (because original software that created such ICC may be more limited)
    Pherhaps you can do that by manually installing that 3td party profile using File menu.

    Yes, I am using macos. Does this change some of your other answers at all?

    #33524

    Vincent
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    Thanks for taking the time to reply.

    Forgive the title. I know that DisplayCAL is not intended for use by dummies but I’m wondering if I can get some clarity on how the “verification” function can be used to do something that I think many non-advanced users want to do. I have read through multiple other threads on a similar theme and I still don’t feel I properly understand everything. I do understand that whatever I measure is limited by the capabilities of my colorimeter. Anyway, here are two basic use cases, and my understanding of the settings to use for them:

    Use case A: I’ve done the displayCAL calibration/profiling process, and created a profile for my monitor. Now I want to check how my monitor performs, with that profile active, compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    • Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    • Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    • Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    • “Use simulation profile as display profile”: unticked
    • Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Use case B:  I want to check how my monitor performs with the default OS profile active (ie without any displayCAL callibration profile), compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    “Use simulation profile as display profile”: ticked
    Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Have I got that right?

    No, that last one verifies if monitor without calibration matches sRGB, not if using factory ICM (installed by driver, usually) your display will be able to show accurate sRGb colors in Photoshop

    I am finding it difficult to understand this sentence.

    Firstly … is “monitor without calibration” not the same thing as “monitor using factory ICM”? (Because I had thought that if I haven’t done any calibration process, and haven’t installed any special profiles, then the monitor must be using its factory ICM or the one the OS applies to it by default)

    Monitor has no ICM. OS has an ICM associated to display. Factory ICM (by windows driver or created on the fly by macOS with EDID data) has no VCGT calibration for GPU so “it has no calibration”, but has display colorspace description .

    Secondly… when you say “matches sRGB” do you mean it matches the sRGB tone curve, or more than that?

    Whole sRGB colospace, hence if you do that kind of verification with a display with a native gamut lose to P3 all verification is going to show big errors even with perfect factory P3 primaries, D65 and sRGB or gamma 2.2 TRC.

    Why? because display is not exactly equal on that OSD settings to sRGB.

    You need to disable “Use simulation profile as display profile” or even better do not use a simulation profile at all. That way you verify if default profile matches display behavior.

    Here are a couple of things that confuse me:

    1. “Simulation profile” basically means the standard, or “ideal” performance, that I’m testing against. This is basically only really about tone response curves or gamma, and doesn’t have anything to do with colourspace, is that right? This confused me for a while because I didn’t understand why I’d test against a particular colourspace. Is there a reason the dialogue doesn’t say something like “simulation profile TRCs as per…” instead of just “simulation profile”. And I guess there is a technical reason it’s labelled “simulation profile” rather than something like “reference profile”, but to me the latter would make things easier to understand.
    1. Read bellow
    1. The option “use simulation profile as display profile” … when I tick this, it’s just telling my computer to send a default signal to the monitor, instead of one modified by any of my custom profiles – is that right?

    It will assign simulation profile to display in OS, hence it will test if uncalibrated display (VCGT) matches exactly that profile => non color managed apps (or maybe verify factory or HW calibration to certain targets)

    If you uncheck it you test how good display is when showing colors in an image with <simulation profile> colorspace under Photoshop. => color managed apps

    Ok, so checking this box is to do with whether I want to test what happens with colour-managed apps vs. non-colour-managed apps? But does this also apply to macos (I am using macos)?

    Mostly an useless task to enable “use simulation profile as display profile” on macOS since whole desktop relies on an ICC associated to display in OS configuration

    1. Under “settings” at the top, what does it mean when I set it to “current”? What I expected this to mean was that instead of using a profile I’ve got selected there, it will use whatever profile I’ve got selected in my OS settings, which could be one of the ones I’ve generated via displayCAL, or it could be a default one, or it could be something else. But if I set it to “current” then it won’t let me do a verification report  (the measurement report button is greyed out). So what is the purpose of the “<Current>” option in that dropdown?

    I can use current so perhaps you didin’t run it previousily or you are using macos or it’s a bug in displaycal.

    IMHO choosing current you shoudl be able to verify current display ICC (maybe generated with another tool, or HW calibration suite) with displaycal CCSS corrections and maths and all its features (because original software that created such ICC may be more limited)
    Pherhaps you can do that by manually installing that 3td party profile using File menu.

    Yes, I am using macos. Does this change some of your other answers at all?

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by Vincent.
    #33530

    Алексей Коробов
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    Use case A: I’ve done the displayCAL calibration/profiling process, and created a profile for my monitor. Now I want to check how my monitor performs, with that profile active, compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    • Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    • Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    • Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    • “Use simulation profile as display profile”: unticked
    • Tone curve: apply black output offset

    Generally you’re right, but in most cases no standard (i.e. sRGB or AdobeRGB) profiles are needed to simulate, so you may simply test new profile with its full gamut. Simulation is more actual when your display does not gain full standard, like 92-95% P3 displays from LG etc.

    Use case B:  I want to check how my monitor performs with the default OS profile active (ie without any displayCAL callibration profile), compared to how the “ideal” monitor would perform

    Settings dropdown at the top of the DisplayCAL window: my newly created profile
    Testchart or reference: Verification testchart
    Simulation profile: (box ticked) and sRGB (assuming intended use is mainly still image work)
    “Use simulation profile as display profile”: ticked
    Tone curve: apply black output offset

    It’s a mistake to assign sRGB profile to unknown display in this test or in any other use case.  On MacOS you can’t work without display ICC profile, check your settings. You can set “current profile” in the top  dropdown box, but DisplayCAL won’t test native display P3 profile as I know (probably, P3 does not contain some data). Standard/simulation profile instead of display profile is only actual when you test display sRGB preset or a preset, calibrated to emulate sRGB in studio displays.

    Note on terms: there’s terms mishmash in displays calibration. In vulgar terms, calibration means creating of display correction to make it “ideal”. But there’s no ideal displays, they have different limitations. Good display is that one covers color gamut of some standard, like sRGB, shows colors with low error, draws smooth gradients and thats image is looked well in different conditions (by example, you can calibrate TN panel, but it’s terrible to use it in color correction cause of narrow viewing angles). In strict terms, calibration is display contrast and white point correction with 3 curves, that are downloaded to videocard gamma table (VCGT). This is needed to get more clean second correction, that’s creation is called characterization or profiling. Calibration curves also allow to make quick current ICC file correction after some time passed. The ICC profile file contains calibration curves and characterization data both, but standard profiles and most of factory profiles don’t contain calibration. VCGT correction is applied independently of other application work, while characterization part is got by color managed application when application starts. Characterization data gives the application information on display RGB color tints, display gamut, contrast, white point and some other. If you change display profile in Monitor Settings (Mac), you don’t change the whole profile usage in Photoshop, you need to restart it for complete display profile change. But DisplayCAL detects <current profile> correctly.

    #33566

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    It’s a mistake to assign sRGB profile to unknown display in this test or in any other use case.  On MacOS you can’t work without display ICC profile, check your settings. You can set “current profile” in the top  dropdown box, but DisplayCAL won’t test native display P3 profile as I know (probably, P3 does not contain some data). Standard/simulation profile instead of display profile is only actual when you test display sRGB preset or a preset, calibrated to emulate sRGB in studio displays.

    Ok, I think that I understand from what you say, and also what Vincent says above, that I should not be using a “simulation profile” for what i want to do.

    That’s fine for when I want to check one of the profiles I’ve created in DisplayCAL.

    But if I want to check the “default profile” (which if I understand right, is an ICC profile that Macos creates based only on the display’s EDID data) then I don’t see how to do this, because the “Measurement Report” button is greyed out when I select <Current> in the settings drop-down.

    So is it the case that it is not possible to test the “default profile” under MacOS in DisplayCal?

    (I have also tried going to “load settings” next to the “settings” dropdown, and manually choosing the default ICC profile, which I can find in a Colorsync folder on my hard disk, but then I just get an error message “this file does not contain settings”. The same happens if I try to load a profile created by other software (for example one created with Datacolor software.)

    #33568

    Vincent
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    It’s a mistake to assign sRGB profile to unknown display in this test or in any other use case.  On MacOS you can’t work without display ICC profile, check your settings. You can set “current profile” in the top  dropdown box, but DisplayCAL won’t test native display P3 profile as I know (probably, P3 does not contain some data). Standard/simulation profile instead of display profile is only actual when you test display sRGB preset or a preset, calibrated to emulate sRGB in studio displays.

    Ok, I think that I understand from what you say, and also what Vincent says above, that I should not be using a “simulation profile” for what i want to do.

    That’s fine for when I want to check one of the profiles I’ve created in DisplayCAL.

    But if I want to check the “default profile” (which if I understand right, is an ICC profile that Macos creates based only on the display’s EDID data) then I don’t see how to do this, because the “Measurement Report” button is greyed out when I select <Current> in the settings drop-down.

    So is it the case that it is not possible to test the “default profile” under MacOS in DisplayCal?

    Maybe it is a bug.

    Try “File / install profile” and choose factory or 3rd party ICC v2 profile. That way it should appear on settings combo box and you can select it for verification.

    #33573

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    It’s a mistake to assign sRGB profile to unknown display in this test or in any other use case.  On MacOS you can’t work without display ICC profile, check your settings. You can set “current profile” in the top  dropdown box, but DisplayCAL won’t test native display P3 profile as I know (probably, P3 does not contain some data). Standard/simulation profile instead of display profile is only actual when you test display sRGB preset or a preset, calibrated to emulate sRGB in studio displays.

    Ok, I think that I understand from what you say, and also what Vincent says above, that I should not be using a “simulation profile” for what i want to do.

    That’s fine for when I want to check one of the profiles I’ve created in DisplayCAL.

    But if I want to check the “default profile” (which if I understand right, is an ICC profile that Macos creates based only on the display’s EDID data) then I don’t see how to do this, because the “Measurement Report” button is greyed out when I select <Current> in the settings drop-down.

    So is it the case that it is not possible to test the “default profile” under MacOS in DisplayCal?

    Maybe it is a bug.

    Try “File / install profile” and choose factory or 3rd party ICC v2 profile. That way it should appear on settings combo box and you can select it for verification.

    I tried File/install display device profile,   choosing the default profile, and also a 3rd party profile. In both cases, it says “installed and activated”, and if I go to my macOS display preferences I can see that it has been activated, but it doesn’t appear in the “settings” dropdown in DisplayCAL.

    I also tried File/upload profile  … in that case I get the error message “the profile does not contain the necessary meta information”

    #33575

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    I am finding this completely confusing… because the advice on this thread seems to be that if I want to test a display in its “default” state, I need to not be using a simulation profile. This seems to make sense to me, but the settings simply won’t allow me to carry out a verification profile on <current>, unless I choose a simulation profile.

    So, maybe this is a bug, but I can advice in several other threads, for example here:

    Run measurement report on current settings?

    and here:

    Testing & Reviewing Uncalibrated Monitors – Results Problem

    Where the advice seems to be to select a simulation profile, use “use simulation profile as display profile”, select tone curve “unmodified”. This is in response to people who seem to have the same issue as me… the button is greyed out unless I use these settings, which suggests it’s not a bug, but then I am completely unclear about what the significance of the “simulation profile” I select is.

    #33576

    Алексей Коробов
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    Vincent, I suggest to test old Argyll on Mac. I remember that two years ago internal P3 test worked well. I’ve already met another bug in Argyll, v 2.2.x can’t create colorimeter correction, so I still use 2.1.2. I haven’t tested the newest 2.3 for it, but I use 2.2…2.3 for i1Pro 3 Plus, that was not supported in previous versions.

    i1Basic Pro 2 on Amazon  
    Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

    #33577

    Vincent
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    This is in response to people who seem to have the same issue as me… the button is greyed out unless I use these settings, which suggests it’s not a bug

    Windows users do not have such limitation, hence I imply that it is a bug.

    but then I am completely unclear about what the significance of the “simulation profile” I select is.

    Choose as simulation profile your current display profile (open folder icon) + use simulation as display profile.
    It should work as validating current profile on displays & profiles without VCGT calibration.
    It may not work if you test a 3rd party profile with VCGT calibration (I’m not sure if it will load VCGT, you can try)

    #33578

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    I have an M1 mac, and I needed to follow the steps described in this thread:

    Mac Mini can’t detect Monitor w/ DisplayCal from Monitors

    in order to get displaycal working. I think this means that I have version 2.3 of Argyll because that’s what the link here:

    https://www.argyllcms.com/downloadmac.html

    led me to.

    But that reddit thread suggests that 2.2 will also work on M1.

    So is it worth me trying to replace 2.3 with 2.2?

    #33579

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    but then I am completely unclear about what the significance of the “simulation profile” I select is.

    Choose as simulation profile your current display profile (open folder icon) + use simulation as display profile.
    It should work as validating current profile on displays & profiles without VCGT calibration.
    It may not work if you test a 3rd party profile with VCGT calibration (I’m not sure if it will load VCGT, you can try)

    Ok. Thank you. It will let me choose my display “default” profile here and then run “measurement report” as long as I choose “tone curve > unmodified” . I will see what happens, and then also try with a 3rd party one.

    #33582

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    Choose as simulation profile your current display profile (open folder icon) + use simulation as display profile.
    It should work as validating current profile on displays & profiles without VCGT calibration.
    It may not work if you test a 3rd party profile with VCGT calibration (I’m not sure if it will load VCGT, you can try)

    So, here are the results of trying some measurements using this method.

    It would let me load a previously generated calibrated profile, from a 3rd party software. I ran the test several times, changing the profile that was set in my macos display preferences, to make sure it was definitely measuring what I’d selected in the “simulation profile” dropdown rather than what was selected in macos preferences. This confirmed that the measurements were being done according to what I had chosen in the displayCAL dialogue, not the macOS settings.

    It unfortunately would not let me test the “default” profile (the one that I assume is generated by my OS). When i tried doing this I got an error message “[Errno 2] No such file or directory”.

    Then i tried running a test, putting one of my displayCAL-generated profiles in the “simulation profile” dropdown. It let me do this, and gave me a report that seemed to confirm that this profile was more accurate than the one I’d previously generated in other (datacolor) calibration software.

    Then I wanted to see if selecting a profile in “simulation profile” and ticking “use simulation profile as display profile” was effectively the same thing as selecting that same profile in the “settings” dropdown at the top of the displayCAL profile and then unticking the “simulation profile” checkbox. So I ran another measurement report with the same profile in the settings dropdown. This gave a very similar set of results, so I think this confirms that the same thing is being measured in each case.

    It’s frustrating that it will not let me test my monitor in “default” state because I am interested to see how much difference applying a calibrated profile makes, compared to applying none. Is there some way of making displayCAL generate a profile which basically matches the default one? In other words, where it has not attempted to apply any calibration or correction, but which might be in a format such that the displayCAL verification process will accept it?

    #33583

    Vincent
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    Copy autogenerated ICC to another folder, and maybe rename if it has a weird hexadecimal name.

    Another way is File / Generate ICC from Extended display data (EDID), but that way ICC will be created from monitor data while Apple generated ICC may have a “forged” TRC chosen by apple (not the same as TRC reported by EDID ). You can use DisplayCAL profile info to inspect that mismatch.

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