Asus PA329C experiences

Home Forums General Discussion Asus PA329C experiences

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #26569

    Martinees
    Participant
    • Offline

    Hello guys, does anyone have an experience with Asus PA329C? I can’t find any reasonable review. I don’t expect top-notch behavior, but nevertheless I would like to use it as GUI monitor for Resolve and have it calibrated (I hate colour shifts in colour viewer in GUI and grading monitor).
    Or is it another garbage from Asus and simply doesn’t worth it? I know the EIZO CS2740 has approx. the same price, however for GUI I would love to obviously have the biggest screen estate as I can get.
    Thanks for your inputs.

    #26572

    MW
    Participant
    • Offline

    For that money you can buy a IPS panel displays with a higher 1500:1 contrast ratio. You will have to decide for yourself what’s more important.
    Brands like Eizo, Nec and Viewsonic earned their reputation. Asus OTOH are in a position where they can get away with cutting corners cause it doesn’t hurt their brand which isn’t pro-oriented to begin with. AFACT Eizo which has an egde for DisplayCal integration.

    #26580

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Hello guys, does anyone have an experience with Asus PA329C? I can’t find any reasonable review. I don’t expect top-notch behavior, but nevertheless I would like to use it as GUI monitor for Resolve and have it calibrated (I hate colour shifts in colour viewer in GUI and grading monitor).
    Or is it another garbage from Asus and simply doesn’t worth it? I know the EIZO CS2740 has approx. the same price, however for GUI I would love to obviously have the biggest screen estate as I can get.
    Thanks for your inputs.

    If it is like its PA brothers horrible uniformity issues and poor HW cal software. I would say a big NO.

    Calibration issues can be solved using OSD for WP and a reasonable GPU for grey, or even software LUT3D for full correction… but uniformity cannot be fixed. Even if display has some kind of uniformity compensation it destroys contrast fixing uniformity issues. Since you want it for video its a BIG NO.

    OTOH inexpensive “P3″ multimedia displays seem to be less likely to these issues. You can find them in VA or IPS flavors. Since you want to work with video VA panel seems more reasonable. Of course no HW cal, correct white on OSD, grey on GPU (AMD is advised), or full correction on LUT3D software for Resolve.

    For example take a look on 32” UHD models like EW3270U. Under 400 euro, “chances” to get a good one on color uniformity (deltaC), can be measured by DisplayCAL with an i1d3 colorimeter using WLED PFS P3 95% correction bundled with DisplayCAL.
    It is not an Eizo CS but for your particular task may work + 3000:1 contrast. Angle shifts are worse than an IPS, but a 32″ is likely to be seen further than a 24-27″

    #26589

    Christopher
    Participant
    • Offline

    I looked at the EIZO CS2740 and honestly I didn’t buy it because it was a little under performing.  EIZO makes good displays but they are usually expensive.

    #26600

    Martinees
    Participant
    • Offline

    I looked at the EIZO CS2740 and honestly I didn’t buy it because it was a little under performing.  EIZO makes good displays but they are usually expensive.

    Could you please elaborate it more in detail? From the EIZO CS2740 spec sheet I am only concern about lower contrast, but considering IPS technology, its somewhat reasonable, I suppose.

    #26604

    Christopher
    Participant
    • Offline

    I looked at the EIZO CS2740 and honestly I didn’t buy it because it was a little under performing.  EIZO makes good displays but they are usually expensive.

    Could you please elaborate it more in detail? From the EIZO CS2740 spec sheet I am only concern about lower contrast, but considering IPS technology, its somewhat reasonable, I suppose.

    It only has sRGB and AdobeRGB gamut. What do you mean by lower contrast ?

    #26609

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    I looked at the EIZO CS2740 and honestly I didn’t buy it because it was a little under performing.  EIZO makes good displays but they are usually expensive.

    Could you please elaborate it more in detail? From the EIZO CS2740 spec sheet I am only concern about lower contrast, but considering IPS technology, its somewhat reasonable, I suppose.

    It only has sRGB and AdobeRGB gamut. What do you mean by lower contrast ?

    That is false. All LED “AdobeRGB-like” widegamuts cover a huge portion of P3 too (more than 93%), even if not advertised.
    Native gamut has near sRGB blue, near AdobeRGB green and near P3 red.
    Also Eizo’s Color Navigator can be configured to emulate aribitrary “ideal” colorspace inside native gamut by entering xy coordinates of R, G or B emulated primaries… for example try to simulate a mobile phone.

    For near Full P3 and Full AdoberGB and 1500:1 constrast you need to go to WLED PFS backlights in newer CG series.
    CS series uses more typical IPS panels with 1000:1 and depending actual backlight it will cover near full P3 (93-94%, GB-LED) or almost full P3(98-99%, WLED PFS in AdobeRGB flavor).
    Nominal contrast ratios are at native white, at certain whitepoints it will be lower (target  whitefurther from native white, lower constrast)

    #26610

    Martinees
    Participant
    • Offline

    Yes, absolutely right Vincent. Especially if I want to use 3D Lut in Resolve is better to have all other calibration features turned off and let it run in native gamut without any additional clipping.

    According to this review of CS2740 at Prad.de the constrast ratio in DUE Uniformity mode is only 730:1, which seems to be quite low by nowadays means.

    #26611

    Martinees
    Participant
    • Offline

    If it is like its PA brothers horrible uniformity issues and poor HW cal software. I would say a big NO.

    Calibration issues can be solved using OSD for WP and a reasonable GPU for grey, or even software LUT3D for full correction… but uniformity cannot be fixed. Even if display has some kind of uniformity compensation it destroys contrast fixing uniformity issues. Since you want it for video its a BIG NO.

    I agree, uniformity cannot be fixed.  It seems that Asus PA is so bad, that nobody  wants to review their newer models 😉

    OTOH inexpensive “P3″ multimedia displays seem to be less likely to these issues. You can find them in VA or IPS flavors. Since you want to work with video VA panel seems more reasonable. Of course no HW cal, correct white on OSD, grey on GPU (AMD is advised), or full correction on LUT3D software for Resolve.

    For example take a look on 32” UHD models like EW3270U. Under 400 euro, “chances” to get a good one on color uniformity (deltaC), can be measured by DisplayCAL with an i1d3 colorimeter using WLED PFS P3 95% correction bundled with DisplayCAL.
    It is not an Eizo CS but for your particular task may work + 3000:1 contrast. Angle shifts are worse than an IPS, but a 32″ is likely to be seen further than a 24-27″

    Thank you Vincent, the EW3270U looks interesting. I never consider such cheap category, but it might worth to take a look. Have you any other models in your mind in this category of P3 multimedia displays?
    I am little bit worry about calibration stability and fluctuating parameters over the time. I am looking for a 4k panel around 3000USD, that could be used in semi-professional video color grading environment (meaning that I can make grading at home in these strange times and finish it in a post production house).

    #26612

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Yes, absolutely right Vincent. Especially if I want to use 3D Lut in Resolve is better to have all other calibration features turned off and let it run in native gamut without any additional clipping.

    According to this review of CS2740 at Prad.de the constrast ratio in DUE Uniformity mode is only 730:1, which seems to be quite low by nowadays means.

    DUE uniformity = “uniformity on”, it’s expected to be low. Since all CS or CG series have superb color uniformity (deltaC, color tints) Uniformity ON corrects brightness uniformity

    DUE brightness = “uniformity off” is the one which is “low” on review because it should be ~900:1 or better at D65.

    If you want if for video even 1000:1 can be low (all non CG)

    #26613

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    If it is like its PA brothers horrible uniformity issues and poor HW cal software. I would say a big NO.

    Calibration issues can be solved using OSD for WP and a reasonable GPU for grey, or even software LUT3D for full correction… but uniformity cannot be fixed. Even if display has some kind of uniformity compensation it destroys contrast fixing uniformity issues. Since you want it for video its a BIG NO.

    I agree, uniformity cannot be fixed.  It seems that Asus PA is so bad, that nobody  wants to review their newer models 😉

    OTOH inexpensive “P3″ multimedia displays seem to be less likely to these issues. You can find them in VA or IPS flavors. Since you want to work with video VA panel seems more reasonable. Of course no HW cal, correct white on OSD, grey on GPU (AMD is advised), or full correction on LUT3D software for Resolve.

    For example take a look on 32” UHD models like EW3270U. Under 400 euro, “chances” to get a good one on color uniformity (deltaC), can be measured by DisplayCAL with an i1d3 colorimeter using WLED PFS P3 95% correction bundled with DisplayCAL.
    It is not an Eizo CS but for your particular task may work + 3000:1 contrast. Angle shifts are worse than an IPS, but a 32″ is likely to be seen further than a 24-27″

    Thank you Vincent, the EW3270U looks interesting. I never consider such cheap category, but it might worth to take a look. Have you any other models in your mind in this category of P3 multimedia displays?
    I am little bit worry about calibration stability and fluctuating parameters over the time. I am looking for a 4k panel around 3000USD, that could be used in semi-professional video color grading environment (meaning that I can make grading at home in these strange times and finish it in a post production house).

    NEC PA311D is ~2500 euro, IPS, UHD 1500:1, but NEC HW cal software does not support WLED PFS backlight on these new PA: it corrects i1displaypro colorimeter using GB-LED spectral power distribution.
    Anyway, since grey is superb out of the box you can tune whitepoint in OSD wih DisplayCAL or HCFR, then “profile only” in DisplayCAL and make a LUT3D for Resolve.
    AFAIK NEC or Eizo models allow further tune up of HW calibration after they are wrote to display, so if there is a slight error introduced by correcting a WLED PFS display readings from an i1d3 with a GB-LED correction, you can tune it on OSD.

    Or cheaper look for a VA panel or TV. For Rec709 and using resolve LUT3D they can be corrected. Even consider an OLED.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by Vincent.

    i1Display Pro on Amazon  
    Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

    #26615

    Martinees
    Participant
    • Offline

    NEC PA311D is ~2500 euro, IPS, UHD 1500:1, but NEC HW cal software does not support WLED PFS backlight on these new PA: it corrects i1displaypro colorimeter using GB-LED spectral power distribution.

    Thank you Vincent again for your suggests, I just read the review of NECPA311D from prad.de. So weird and sad that even manufacturer like NEC cannot do their HW cal software right with correct colorimeter corrections.

    Anyway, since grey is superb out of the box you can tune whitepoint in OSD wih DisplayCAL or HCFR, then “profile only” in DisplayCAL and make a LUT3D for Resolve.
    AFAIK NEC or Eizo models allow further tune up of HW calibration after they are wrote to display, so if there is a slight error introduced by correcting a WLED PFS display readings from an i1d3 with a GB-LED correction, you can tune it on OSD.

    Do you mean like standard RGB gain/brightness/contrast tuning  on OSD after the hw calibration is done?

    Nevertheless I thought that the best approach in order to have 3D Lut without having banding/artifacts is to turn hw calibration off and leave the panel in natural gamut (expects that natural  gamma response is somewhat in a good shape out of the box), otherwise the dynamic range will be limited at input.
    Is this assumption right?

    Or cheaper look for a VA panel or TV. For Rec709 and using resolve LUT3D they can be corrected. Even consider an OLED.

    Yeah, I am also considering  LG CX48 though.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by Martinees.
    #26617

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    NEC PA311D is ~2500 euro, IPS, UHD 1500:1, but NEC HW cal software does not support WLED PFS backlight on these new PA: it corrects i1displaypro colorimeter using GB-LED spectral power distribution.

    Thank you Vincent again for your suggests, I just read the review of NECPA311D from prad.de. So weird and sad that even manufacturer like NEC cannot do their HW cal software right with correct colorimeter corrections.

    It’s just and EDR file. DisplayCAL has it, it must be something about licensing policy…and maybe price. IDNK if you can “hack” SpectraViewII by replacing PA242W correction EDR by HPZ24x (WLED PFS AdoberGB flavor).

    Anyway, since grey is superb out of the box you can tune whitepoint in OSD wih DisplayCAL or HCFR, then “profile only” in DisplayCAL and make a LUT3D for Resolve.
    AFAIK NEC or Eizo models allow further tune up of HW calibration after they are wrote to display, so if there is a slight error introduced by correcting a WLED PFS display readings from an i1d3 with a GB-LED correction, you can tune it on OSD.

    Do you mean like standard RGB gain/brightness/contrast tuning  on OSD after the hw calibration is done?

    Yes, even Spectraview or colro navigator allow manual tune on program interface

    Nevertheless I thought that the best approach in order to have 3D Lut without having banding/artifacts is to turn hw calibration off and leave the panel in natural gamut (expects that natural  gamma response is somewhat in a good shape out of the box), otherwise the dynamic range will be limited at input.
    Is this assumption right?

    LUT3D are generated at native gamut because you can generate all of them from a single profile. Also this avoids “cuting” portions of target colorspace if HW cal software provided by vendor is not very good.

    Of course you can use no LUT3D at all as long as HW calibration to… let’s say Rec709 gamma 2.4 D65 , its a very good match to Rec709 gamma 2.4 D65 (=equal to content). You can use DisplayCAL to validate this (simulation profile,use simulation profile as display profile), or HCFR.

    #26618

    Martinees
    Participant
    • Offline

    Nevertheless I thought that the best approach in order to have 3D Lut without having banding/artifacts is to turn hw calibration off and leave the panel in natural gamut (expects that natural  gamma response is somewhat in a good shape out of the box), otherwise the dynamic range will be limited at input.
    Is this assumption right?

    LUT3D are generated at native gamut because you can generate all of them from a single profile. Also this avoids “cuting” portions of target colorspace if HW cal software provided by vendor is not very good.

    Of course you can use no LUT3D at all as long as HW calibration to… let’s say Rec709 gamma 2.4 D65 , its a very good match to Rec709 gamma 2.4 D65 (=equal to content). You can use DisplayCAL to validate this (simulation profile,use simulation profile as display profile), or HCFR.

    That means, if the hw calibration works as it should I can calibrate to its biggest offered color space and than create and use 3D LUT on top of it (assume 3D Lut for Rec709, gamma 2.4)?  Wouldn’t that introduce possibility of banding or clipping? I assume that even scaler chips inside EIZO CG and NEC PA use lower 3DLut resolution than 65 point cube.

    #26619

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Dithering is the key. Banding is not dependent on cube resolution (usually 17^3 in HW). Banding happens when you translate a 16bit correction to a 8 or even 10bit channel => truncation. This happens even if you had 256^3 or 1024^3 cube lut. Dithering eliminates that issue. Dither can be software (like MadVR) or HW like AMD dither for 1DLUT in GPU calibration or inside monitor. IDNK if Resolve uses software dither on LUT3D, ask them.

    Cube resolution (nodes) gives you a limit about if some errors can or cannot be corrected …because they are no measured… and they need to me measured. 17^3 cube is about 5000 patches read. If there is an issue between one node RGB value and neighbour but not in nodes it may go unnoticed. But that is not related to banding at all.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by Vincent.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Log in or Register

Display Calibration and Characterization powered by ArgyllCMS