General purpose. Should I buy a colorimeter?

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  • #29541

    Millenium7
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    I’ll first start by saying I have no experience with colorimeters, and little experience with display calibration in general

    My main question is, is it worth it for me to buy a colorimeter to calibrate my monitors?

    The situation is this. I have a MSI MPG341CQR which is already color calibrated from the factory and quite honestly looks fantastic, right next to an IPS it doesn’t give up anything in the colour department and has better contrast………….. in SDR. But in HDR its absolutely garbage, its massively red shifted to the point of white looking light pink. I contacted MSI about this and they insist the display is also HDR calibrated as per spec but either they forgot to load the calibration on mine or they are full of crap. Either way i’m left with the only option for actually using HDR to be a quick mess around with QuickGamma to generate an advanced ICC profile for HDR just to correct this red shift and try and get white closer to actual white. There are no adjustment options in the monitors menu’s when in HDR mode. The profile I made works well enough to achieve the result of white looking white and the net result is gaming in HDR is still quite good, but the colours are wrong. SDR content when in HDR mode looks very flat and dull like a reference panel would

    Hence the idea popped into my head to buy a colorimeter. However the main question is will it be of any use? Keep in mind I know nothing about this, it’s purely an idea in my head and this is a speculative post, so things like 3D LUT? yeah no idea, over my head. But if I bought something like the X-Rite i1 Display Studio can I use it to with my monitor in HDR to calibrate it so the image is correct? I don’t really care about SDR as i’m very happy with the display as it is, but everything i’ve read online doesn’t specifically mention HDR calibration

    That’s the first question, the follow up is what can I do with it outside of that? Hardware calibration for instance, how do I know if say my TV can be hardware calibrated? Or any of my monitors? Or is this strictly to generate an ICC profile for use in Windows?

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    #29571

    Vincent
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    HDR mode = as is in most displays.

    If that display is not actually HDR but SDR with near P3 gamut and a translator from HDR (Rec2020 PQ) to panel capabilities, its better to make a LUT3D in SDR mode and feed that to madVRto watch HDR content. No way of HDR gaming this way.

    #29599

    Millenium7
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    Its a proper HDR display https://www.msi.com/Monitor/Optix-MPG341CQR/Specification

    But its like the colour temperature is completely wrong in HDR. It’s akin to going into the monitor menu and cranking red up by 30%. Otherwise it definitely does display HDR, it’s just that all options are completely locked out when running in HDR, can’t adjust anything on the monitor itself

    So DisplayCAL cannot make a HDR colour profile? What does work for me at the moment is generating an advanced ICC profile from QuickGamma – which is software that only lets you adjust gamma values thats it, I take a lot of red out – and then applying this in Windows. Net result is this profile applies across the board in every single application i’ve tried. All HDR content is then much, much closer to having white actually look white. And when I switch back to SDR this profile is seemingly ignored and everything looks as it should in SDR

    I’m hoping that DisplayCAL could do something similar, run calibration with a colorimeter whilst in HDR mode, do its colour test patterns and see “yep, colours completely screwed” and generate a profile to counter the massive red shift. Apply it and bobs your aunty it should result in perfect colour, no?

    Keep in mind i’m a completely newbie at this sort of stuff, so I really have no idea how it actually works and what goes on under the hood. All I know is I have some amount of success with a gamma profile, but I want it fine tuned to be correct across the spectrum, not just a broad gamma adjustment

    #29605

    Vincent
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    Its a proper HDR display https://www.msi.com/Monitor/Optix-MPG341CQR/Specification

    It isn’t, 3000:1

    But its like the colour temperature is completely wrong in HDR. It’s akin to going into the monitor menu and cranking red up by 30%. Otherwise it definitely does display HDR, it’s just that all options are completely locked out when running in HDR, can’t adjust anything on the monitor itself

    No. It translates Rec2020 PQ content to panel capabilities like any other display which accepts HDR signal.

    So DisplayCAL cannot make a HDR colour profile? What does work for me at the moment is generating an advanced ICC profile from QuickGamma – which is software that only lets you adjust gamma values thats it, I take a lot of red out – and then applying this in Windows. Net result is this profile applies across the board in every single application i’ve tried. All HDR content is then much, much closer to having white actually look white. And when I switch back to SDR this profile is seemingly ignored and everything looks as it should in SDR

    No. It’s monitor’s fault: translation from Rec2020 to panel capabilities cannot be disabled.

    I’m hoping that DisplayCAL could do something similar, run calibration with a colorimeter whilst in HDR mode, do its colour test patterns and see “yep, colours completely screwed” and generate a profile to counter the massive red shift. Apply it and bobs your aunty it should result in perfect colour, no?

    Keep in mind i’m a completely newbie at this sort of stuff, so I really have no idea how it actually works and what goes on under the hood. All I know is I have some amount of success with a gamma profile, but I want it fine tuned to be correct across the spectrum, not just a broad gamma adjustment

    It could be possible IF you monitor supported what I wrote in other threads:
    -can disable HDR translator but keep HDR backlight (FALD+max brightness)
    -has a public API to upload a LUT3D to monitor, or vendor has a tool to do that.

    HDR mode is “as is” unless display has those features, although some of them (mostly TVs) meet those requirements partially (like 10 point greyscale to do not “deform” full translator cube)

    • This reply was modified 13 hours, 58 minutes ago by Vincent.
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