Whitepoint Dell Alienware AW3423DW QD-OLED

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  • #36320

    Stefan C
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    The factory calibrated creator mode looks like it has a blue light filter. The whitepoint 6500k looks way too warm to me.
    When I run verification on it, it measures correctly. I’m using a colorchecker display pro. What is the deal with this?

    Setting the RGB values to R58, G62, B100 looks much closer. I tried perceptually matching with a macbook but from what I’ve seen, LED backlit panels can also suffer from metamerism so may not be ideal for this.

    Are these values acceptable? Will I see negative effects from setting them so far out from the default?

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Stefan C.
    • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Stefan C.
    • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Stefan C.
    #36326

    Vincent
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    The factory calibrated creator mode looks like it has a blue light filter. The whitepoint 6500k looks way too warm to me.
    When I run verification on it, it measures correctly. I’m using a colorchecker display pro. What is the deal with this?

    That you may be not using proper correction. Search colorimeter database for a custom one, rent an spectrophotometer… or use RGB OLED correction (several samples bundled with default i1d3 pack), although thye may be a litte different than RGB OLED in shorter wavelengths.

    So if you do not have a custom correctio for that samsung, match numerically as an starting point with a RGB OLED correctuion, then visual mach till it looks whie. remember to DO NOT use abs colorimetric when making lUT3D if you are doing a visual match/visual white point editor.

    Setting the RGB values to R58, G62, B100 looks much closer. I tried perceptually matching with a macbook but from what I’ve seen, LED backlit panels can also suffer from metamerism so may not be ideal for this.

    Of course there is metamerism, otherwise you can be able to render an sRGB image on a QDLED and expect to look the same as in a WLED or WLED PFS or a GB-LED display.
    Metamerism IS NOT what you think it is. Metamers look equal to an observer under certain conditions.

    #36327

    Vincent
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    The factory calibrated creator mode looks like it has a blue light filter.

    Sometimes vendor bundle default factory ICC with VCGT curves. Its a silly way to do it but sometimes they do. Just check default profile VCGT/calibration curves and if there is a calibration, un do it or do a custom one yourself since you have a colorimeter.

    Also all factory presets are expected to be wrong to some extent, so factory “6500K” preset on OSD means nothing.

    #36351

    Raj S
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    It’s “metameric failure” that you’re referring to. It’s a common issue. So common that the “Calman Home for LG” thread on AVSforum has 600 pages of people trying to get their whitepoint to look like it should. And that’s just a regular OLED, not even a QD-OLED which is even more precise with its spectral distribution.

    The solution to this is to perceptual match or to use someone else’s whitepoint offset.

    Just make sure your Macbook is calibrated first before you attempt any perceptual match. Apple devices often have a 7000K-7200K whitepoint by default. So make sure it’s calibrated to D65 first. And make sure you’ve selected the right backlight type for the correction.

    https://www.lightillusion.com/perceptual_match_guide.html – this is a good guide, you can use the same method but with DisplayCAL’s “Visual whitepoint editor”

    Also don’t worry about your Macbook having metameric failure. You’re probably referring to the WLED PFS Phosphor backlight type and the sharp red peaks. It’s much less severe than tech like OLED and Quantum Dot. So you may not even notice it.

    #36357

    Stefan C
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    Yes sorry I was referring to metameric failure as opposed to metamerism. I couldn’t get displaycal running on the mac, downloaded the latest argyll drivers but it freezes when you click calibrate.
    I tried using ccprofiler but I’m not sure the colorimeter correction they suggest to use is appropriate for a 2020 macbook air, that too looked very warm calibrated to 6500k.
    I’ll have another look

    I wondered too will setting the RGB levels with a fair amount more blue reduce the dynamic range or is it purely a gain thing to ensure white point is correct?

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Stefan C.
    #36360

    Vincent
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    I tried using ccprofiler but I’m not sure the colorimeter correction they suggest to use is appropriate for a 2020 macbook air, that too looked very warm calibrated to 6500k.

    It lacks of proper correction for P3 Apple displays. Closer one is WLED “PFS phosphor” bunldes ith i1Profiler/ccProfiler but it has a main green wavelength sorter than Apple’s and a slight modified red channel with a hump in shorter wavelengths to make it exactly P3 red.

    So if you wish to use ccProfiler
    -use its WLED PFS correction (Panasonic VVX 95%P3) and live with its WP drift (if any)
    -use its 95% P3 WLED PFS correction and Apple P3 WLED PFS correction with DisplayCAL and calculate an offset to apply to target WP, then use ccProfiler with 95% P3 WLED PFS and that offset applied to target WP. You can use another computer to measure macbook wp with argyllcms “spotread” over a 255 white in GIMP  (uncalibrated macbook) or other tricks if your macbook cannot run ArgyllCMS 2.3.1 (you shoudl try to run manually spotread with “-X my_ccss_file_path.ccss” as param)
    -build manually a forged version of Panasonic VVX replacing its spectral data with Apple P3 CCSS data bundled with displaycal (BEWARE channel order! you may need to reorder it, plot them with “specplot ccss_file.ccss”). You can do it in text (CCSS file, use a copy of Panasonic VVX as base) and then translate to binary EDR with python tool ccss2edr (google it). Place that EDR in ccProfiler folder where oyther EDR are placed, replacing original Panasonic VVX EDR file (make a backlup).

    2nd one may be faster if you are not experienced. Resulting WP may be out of dayligt curve if measured with the same 95% P3 WLED PFS phosphor correction. Ignire it unless measured with the proper one it is out of daylight curve.

    #36362

    Raj S
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    I wondered too will setting the RGB levels with a fair amount more blue reduce the dynamic range or is it purely a gain thing to ensure white point is correct?

    The RGB levels only adjusts the white point so no need to worry. It’s always preferred to adjust the RGB controls instead of letting the calibration profile do it for you. Relying on just calibration will reduce the available contrast ratio because some is spent trying to correct the whitepoint.

    #36363

    Stefan C
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    -use its 95% P3 WLED PFS correction and Apple P3 WLED PFS correction with DisplayCAL and calculate an offset to apply to target WP, then use ccProfiler with 95% P3 WLED PFS and that offset applied to target WP. You can use another computer to measure macbook wp with argyllcms “spotread” over a 255 white in GIMP (uncalibrated macbook) or other tricks if your macbook cannot run ArgyllCMS 2.3.1 (you shoudl try to run manually spotread with “-X my_ccss_file_path.ccss” as param)

    I think I follow; do you mean use the PC to measure whitepoint with ‘95% P3 WLED PFS’ then measure with ‘Apple P3 WLED PFS’ take note of the difference and then use that as the offset for ‘PFS Phosphor’ in CCProfiler?

    #36376

    Vincent
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    Yes.

    #36440

    EP98
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    QD-OLED gets pretty close to D65 on a CRT.  You can just target D65 on them without a perceptual match and they get really close. As long as you have a spectro of some kind.

    In Hollywood they usually target D65 on LG WRGB OLED’s. They usually don’t use an Alternate White Point. LG OLED’s also get close to D65. Most shifts I’ve seen are from poor uniformity and poor viewing angles. Usually towards Cyan/Magenta depending on Evo or non Evo panel.

    Only panels I’ve seen that have a huge metameric failure and need alternate White Point are QD-LCD’s and RGB OLED’s.

    #36441

    EP98
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    Also the guide for Perceptual Matching on light illusion colourspace website was meant for RGB OLED’s as those look extremly green at D65.

    They mentioned that to a lesser extent WRGB OLED’s suffer metameric failure as I have verified myself when I compared to my Sony Broadcast CRT.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by EP98.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by EP98.
    #36445

    Stefan C
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    The panel in the Alienware is an RGB OLED

    #36446

    EP98
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    It’s a QD-OLED different spectral power distribution then RGB OLED. Doesn’t suffer metameric failure as bad as RGB OLED.

    Issue might be you are not using a Spectroradiometer.

    I personally will not do any calibration without a spectro of some kind because your calibrations won’t be anywhere near accurate.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by EP98.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by EP98.
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