Original GretagMacbeth Eye-One Display vs Eye-One Display 2

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  • #35553

    BrandonV
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    I have an original GretagMacbeth Eye-One Display (part number 36.88.32). I was wondering if anyone knew how it compares to the Eye-One Display 2. Also, does anyone know if the colorimeter correction matrices for the Display 2 are appropriate to use when using a eye-one display on a wide gamut monitor?

    I’d like to upgrade to a spectrophotometer type display calibration device, or at least a newer colorimeter, but for the time being I need to use what I have.

    #35557

    Vincent
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    You’ll need to create a custom CCMX correction for each display and colorimeter. CCMX matrices created by others are not going to work properly due to the high interinstrument variability and the fast aging of the filters in those models (i1d1, i1d2).

    It is cheaper by far to get an i1d3 and rely on bundled & community corrections than to buy an spectrophotometer and correct your older colorimeters, even if it is 2nd hand. Also i1d3 is faster, really fast compared with i1d1/i1d2.

    #35559

    BrandonV
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    What I meant was a spectrometer to directly measure the spectrum of the monitor in order to find the primaries and subsequently generate an ICC profile.

    In any case, I kind of suspected the old colorimeter I have might have degraded some. While the profiles it generates are certainly reasonable on a wide gamut monitor, I notice that it measures the green output as being very high in the white point setting phase of the displaycal program. Hardware adjustment still results in green being measured as too high and looks awful, so I just use the measured white point instead of trying to calibrate to a specific coordinate. It does the same thing however on the very low gamut native display on my laptop.

    The attached photo shows what I mean. The correlated color temperature corresponding to the measured white point is 11054 Kelvin, which seems kind of hard to believe.

    Yet, the end result when done profiling seems correct and the primaries are about what I’d expect on both the native display and external wide gamut screen. Weird.

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    #35561

    Vincent
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    What I meant was a spectrometer to directly measure the spectrum of the monitor in order to find the primaries and subsequently generate an ICC profile.

    For that you can use:

    -EDID data, if it could be trusted (File, create profile form  extended display info)
    or
    -Create a synth profile with no calibration with the RGB primaries with the coords measured by your aged colorimeter (since you said they are in place)

    In any case, I kind of suspected the old colorimeter I have might have degraded some. While the profiles it generates are certainly reasonable on a wide gamut monitor, I notice that it measures the green output as being very high in the white point setting phase of the displaycal program. Hardware adjustment still results in green being measured as too high and looks awful, so I just use the measured white point instead of trying to calibrate to a specific coordinate. It does the same thing however on the very low gamut native display on my laptop.

    The attached photo shows what I mean. The correlated color temperature corresponding to the measured white point is 11054 Kelvin, which seems kind of hard to believe.

    Yet, the end result when done profiling seems correct and the primaries are about what I’d expect on both the native display and external wide gamut screen. Weird.

    Set white visually using RGB gains. Once it looks white set DisplayCAL calibration target to white point as measured, then calibrate grey with that white reference.
    But since green error is so high maybe brighteness reading cannot be trusted at all and you’ll need a new device.

    If your old monitor has neutral grey and gamma is more or less in place try to create an ICC withut grey calibration as explained above.
    If grey really needs correction you’ll need a new device, an i1d3 is recommended.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 2 days ago by Vincent.
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