Matching Macbook Pro Late-2016 to Dell UP2715K

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Vincent 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #15169

    Mike Grittani
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    Hello,

    First of all, I’d like to thank those involved in making this software available—for free, nonetheless.  I am extremely impressed by its versatility so far and I’m excited to get it working correctly!

    I am having difficulty matching my two primary screens: the Macbook Pro Late-2016 Retina screen to my newly-acquired Dell UP2715K.  After running what I assume are accurate settings during calibration, the Dell is tinted green and the Macbook is closer to being tinted purple.  I have read from a few sources that the “best” way to calibrate the Dell is using their utility (DUCCS) with an XRite checker.  I do not own an XRite, and I am hoping that with the versatility of DisplayCAL I can successfully match my two screens.

    I am calibrating with a Spyder5PRO.  Both screens are utilizing factory settings.  DisplayCAL settings are as follow:

    Macbook Pro | Spyder5 | LCD (Generic) | Whitepoint As Measured at 77.27% brightness (~286 cd/m^2) | White level As Measured (~7232K)| Tone curve Gamma 2.2

    Dell UP2715K / Spyder5 / Wide Gamut LCD (RGB LED) | Whitepoint As Measured (~322 cd/m^2) | White level As Measured (~7427K) | Tone curve Gamma 2.2

    I then ran verification on both resulting ICC profiles—these reports are attached to this thread.  Thank you for any suggestions you can come up with!

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    #15174

    Vincent
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    If you run a calibration setting  white point target “as measured” … white won’t be corrected, hence the two displays are very likely to have different whitepoint.

    Re run calibration but this time set the same white for the two screens (for example 6500K daylight), then compare again.

    If you do not wish to “limit” the laptop’s output in its graphics card use “as measured” for white target in laptop, then set laptop’s white (from profile or measured) as Dell’s target white.

    Since a Spyder5 is not an accurate device and Spyder bundles corrections are not a match for those displays backlight it is possible that you do not solve white mismatch. If that happens:
    -after calibrating laptop use Displaycal “visual whitepoint editor” for the Dell and play with Dell’s RGB gains in OSD to get a match
    -buy a more accurate measurement device (i1displaypro)

    i1Display Pro on Amazon  
    Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

    #15177

    Mike Grittani
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    Dear Vincent, thank you so much for your thorough reply.  Here were my findings:

    I re-ran calibration with the white point set to 6500K on both displays.  The results were even less appealing than my original problematic setup.  The Macbook Pro was very orange (warm), while the Dell was very green.

    I then re-ran calibration with the white point “As Measured” on the Macbook Pro, resulting in 7133K.  After the Macbook calibration finished, I re-ran with the Spyder on the Dell at whitepoint 7133.  The results were still dissatisfactory — an overwhelming strong green tint on the Dell.

    I hope there are some more suggestions that I might be able to try through the forum, but for now, I think I might start looking into purchasing a XRite i1Display Pro.

    #15182

    Florian Höch
    Administrator
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    There’s a FAQ entry for visually matching two display whitepoints.

    #15186

    Mike Grittani
    Participant
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    Thanks Florian.  Can you provide a link to the specific FAQ you’re referring to? I couldn’t find one matching via the forum search results.

    #15188

    Florian Höch
    Administrator
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    It’s one of the sticky threads.

    #15190

    Vincent
    Participant
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    Dear Vincent, thank you so much for your thorough reply.  Here were my findings:

    I re-ran calibration with the white point set to 6500K on both displays.  The results were even less appealing than my original problematic setup.  The Macbook Pro was very orange (warm), while the Dell was very green.

    That “very orange” value -“not looking white by any means”- is caused by using wrong correction for that colorimeter&display and/or innacurate measurement device.

    Unless you get a new device of fiund a suitable correction (renting an spectro) you’ll have to use a visual approach not only for matching displays but also to get your desired white.
    If laptop’s native white looks pleasing to your eyes you may skip it.

    I then re-ran calibration with the white point “As Measured” on the Macbook Pro, resulting in 7133K.  After the Macbook calibration finished, I re-ran with the Spyder on the Dell at whitepoint 7133.  The results were still dissatisfactory — an overwhelming strong green tint on the Dell.

    Actually I didn’t write exactly that.
    I wrote to test if setting a comon white coodinate as target solves your problem. If problem is solved but you do not whish to apply limitations to laptop’s contrast or luminance, then try using laptops native white as “target” instead a common white like 6500K daylight.
    My apologies if I did not explain it properly.

    I hope there are some more suggestions that I might be able to try through the forum, but for now, I think I might start looking into purchasing a XRite i1Display Pro.

    Alternatives are using “visual whitepoint editor” that I wrote in my last paragraph, as Florian suggest

    Thanks Florian.  Can you provide a link to the specific FAQ you’re referring to? I couldn’t find one matching via the forum search results.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Vincent.
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