Matching Displays – What am I missing?

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  • #24652

    Marvin Nuecklaus
    Participant
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    I’m using a MacBook Pro late 2017 and an LG 34UC98 and a X-rite i1 Display Pro.

    I’m trying to match my LG Monitor to my MacBook Pro. I read through all documentation and FAQ on this website. However, I’m still not getting satisfactory results.

    Here’s the workflow I followed.

    • Calibrating MacBookPro first due to missing RGB hardware controls and satisfying white point
    • Set correction to LCD PFS Phosphor WLED IPS
    • Set Whitepoint to 6500K
    • White level 120 cd/m2
    • Black Level As Measured
    • Tone Curve Gamma 2.2 relative 100% black output offset
    • Single curve + matrix, black point compensation
    • Testchart with 175 Patches
    • 3D LUT in Gamma 2.2 relative 100% Black output offset
    • Disabled apply calibration (vcgt)

    Now this calibration got me pretty good results. Now I tried to match my LG this setting with the objection to keep my white point at 6500K.

    • Set correction to LCD White LED family
    • For Whitepoint I tried 3 different approaches
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    1. Set to 6500K
    2. Copied the XY coordinates from my MacBook Pro Report (Measured whitepoints)
    3. Used visual whitepoint editor, tried to match the white with RGB hardware settings, clicked on measure
    • White level 120 cd/m2
    • Black Level As Measured
    • Tone Curve Gamma 2.2 Relative 100% Black output offset
    • Single Curve + matrix, black point compensation
    • Testchart with 175 Patches
    • 3D LUT in Gamma 2.2 relative 100% Black output offset
    • Disabled apply calibration (vcgt)

    Now, one thing I’m confused about is in regard to the Interactive display adjustment. If I either copied the xy coordinates from my MacBook Pro results OR used the visual whitepoint editor, I don’t use that window to match the desired whitepoint, correct? I would only do that if I chose 6500K as target?

    Now, no matter which approaches in regards to my whitepoint I chose, none of them matched very well. Also, my Report for my LG Monitor shows me NOT OK for Measured vs. assumed target whitepoint, Average ΔE*00, and Maximum ΔE*00. Why is that?

    I attached both reports.

    Another question is in regards to the black point. According to the documentation, when using a display that has a higher blackpoint (lower contrast ratio), you want to sacrifice the higher contrast ratio’s Display. In praxis, does that mean I run my reference display profiling first (high contrast ratio) on native black level, then my secondary monitor (lower contrast ratio) also on native black level as I don’t know yet what the max black level this display is capable off, and then run another profiling of my reference monitor again and adjusting the black level to the one of my secondary display?

    And my last one is a rookie question. I use my MacBook in different environments when doing noncritical color work and need to adjust my brightness manually. When going back to my studio, do I need to recalibrate since I’m not matching my target 120 cd/m2 anymore? Is there a function that does it automatically for me?

    Sorry for this long one, I tried to elaborate as well as I can recall. I hope to get some clarity to this mess.

    Attachments:
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    #24781

    Zachary K.
    Participant
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    Full disclosure: I’m a layman who was trying to match my monitors around the same time as you.

    After reading literally all of Florian’s DisplayCal documentation and FAQs on this site, I was able to get as close a match as I could with different panel types. As for your different measured vs assumed whitepoint – The program assumed you were going for 6400k, but the measured was 6358k, which was too far away. That doesn’t matter, if you didn’t set 6400k, which you did not in any of your whitepoint matching methods.

    As for how I achieved my best match with different monitor panel types, I had to start experimenting with the “Ambient light level” advanced option. First I measured the ambient light level using my device and made profiles with it and then I started manually increasing the ambient light lux number and comparing results. There’s also additional advanced settings under “Profile type”, if you select the gear icon next to it. (As long as you’re using XYZ Lut + Matrix, which you should be imo). There I changed my destination viewing condition to a darkened room. That setting on one monitor matched wonderfully with my manually increased ambient light setting of the other two monitors.

    It seems matching is a very tricky thing to do.

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 7 hours ago by Zachary K..
    #24783

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Full disclosure: I’m a layman who was trying to match my monitors around the same time as you.

    After reading literally all of Florian’s DisplayCal documentation and FAQs on this site, I was able to get as close a match as I could with different panel types. As for your different measured vs assumed whitepoint – The program assumed you were going for 6400k, but the measured was 6358k, which was too far away. That doesn’t matter, if you didn’t set 6400k, which you did not in any of your whitepoint matching methods.

    No. CCT does not matter at all. “Assumed” chooses the closest white in daylight curve to projection of your actual white in that curve (proyect a point in a plane to a line), at 100K increments. dE from that assumed whitepoint is an indication of pink/green white which can be very noticeable rather than CCT axis (yellow blue) which does not matter too much.

    As for how I achieved my best match with different monitor panel types, I had to start experimenting with the “Ambient light level” advanced option. First I measured the ambient light level using my device and made profiles with it and then I started manually increasing the ambient light lux number and comparing results. There’s also additional advanced settings under “Profile type”, if you select the gear icon next to it. (As long as you’re using XYZ Lut + Matrix, which you should be imo). There I changed my destination viewing condition to a darkened room. That setting on one monitor matched wonderfully with my manually increased ambient light setting of the other two monitors.

    It seems matching is a very tricky thing to do.

    Again, no. Ambient light does not work as you may think, and color managed apps will undo whatever you do.
    First match displays numerically with the closest colorimeter correction for each backlight you can get, then if there is significative visual difference use visual white point editor on the display that is “off”. When doing LUT3D for that display with a visual whitepoint match, use relative colorimetric intent to keep that white uncorrected.
    And that’s all…

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 6 hours ago by Vincent.
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