Looking to check results of calibration

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  • #13890

    AlexisN
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    Hi everyone,

    I recently set up my new monitor (Acer KG251Q). It’s attached to my ancient HP Pav Dv6 laptop via HDMI (used the projector mode to calibrate Acer).

    I ran the calibration/profiling last night around midnight, where the only source of light came from my monitor.  The colors look great to me, however, I just wanted to double check if everything looks okay to more experienced eyes. (If it helps to know, my settings were LCD white LED IPS, Colormunki Display/LCD generic, 6500k, 120.00cd/m2, gamma 2.2, high speed and profile quality)

    I also checked out the lagom LCD test and noticed a few inconsistencies (specifically the sharpness and gamma portions of the tests). I primarily will be using my setup for photography and have a main interest in color accuracies for prints.

    I’ve attached the profile information and measurement report to this post but can post it in the forum directly if needed.

    Thanks,

    Alexis

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    #13893

    AlexisN
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    Hi, I actually read through the forums and got more advice and decided to rerun my calibration from scratch. Attaching the new measurement report here!

    A few questions I have from reading through the threads.

    1. I’m seeing that Firefox is the best browser to view accurate colors (sad about this because I love chrome)
    2. I use PS CC 2018, Lightroom CC, premiere pro, and after effects, is there anything special I need to do for my calibration profiles to keep things consistent across all programs?
    3. Any other tips you can suggest for me, in dealing with photography – srgb viewed online and/or accurate colors when printing?

    Thanks, all respective files attached to this new update.

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    #13898

    Vincent
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    2. IDNK what is the actual shape of your displays gamut against sRGB (a*b* 2D plot) but your txt profile info says 88%. It’s an intersection value, actual display gamut volume can be bigger that sRGB volumne… but there is no 100% intersection.

    That means 2 things:
    -color managed apps like PS/LR will try to “cut” when rendering colors that your display cannot show (relative colorimetric)
    -non color managed apps like premiere will output RGB values expecting that your display response matches exactly the content colorspace . For example Rec709 video ( ~ sRGB gamut)

    Explained with an example. sRGB image with 255 solid green color. A lot of <9x% sRGB displays cannot show it.
    -PS/LR will “cut” to your displays closest color
    -Premiere will output 255 native green to screen (scaled from video levels if needed).
    These two rendered colors will be different and could be seen different just by eye inspection. There is little you can do with your current display to solve this.

    3. For sRGB viewing/editing/publishing you’ll have more or less the same issues explained in 2.
    You can use PS softproofing options (relatie colorimetric) to see if your sRGB image has colors that your display cannot show and where they are located.

    For printing you can have the same issues described before but a good start will be:

    -make/buy/ask for profiles for softprofing (and printing if you use your own printer) for the paper types and printing services you are going to use. If you outsource printing most labs will (SHOULD!) have a list of softproofing ICM/ICC files for you to download. Use them. If that outsourced printing service does not provide those profiles, don’t work with them.

    -paper reflects light, so if you put a/your white paper under your light source: reflected color should match display whitepoint and reflected amout of light should match your display white output (cd/m2). Softproof has options to simulate paper white and reduced “ink contrast” so you just need to match light source color which is more versatile if you use different papers.
    Usually light sources for print evaluation are more warm (yellow) than typical display’s white. That warm white could be too far away to use it with your current monitor… so maybe you have to use a compromise solution.
    A good light source + enviroment/box is usually not cheap, even in DIY projects, much more expenssive than your current display. So first of all learn how to/use softproof and after that work you can jump into light sources for printing rabbit hole .

    #13904

    AlexisN
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    Hi, I’ve attached the image of my display’s gamut in the 2D image.

    Would you recommend me returning my monitor for a monitor with a better sRGB range? Just to make things a bit simpler? (any suggestions in the same price range? up to $160?)

    I noticed in the monitor’s settings it does have a sRGB mode, would it help if I calibrated with that turned on?

    However, in the meantime, I am just wondering if everything looked okay with my measurement report. Should I have ran it with the sRGB IEC61966-2.1 Display?

    Thanks for the thorough answers to my questions, i appreciate it.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by AlexisN.
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    #13910

    Vincent
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    However, in the meantime, I am just wondering if everything looked okay with my measurement report.

    Monitor response matchs profile, which is good. IMHO I would like to have a more neutral grey… but for it’s price it is good and if you do not see bands in non color managed gradients then it does not matter at all.

    Should I have ran it with the sRGB IEC61966-2.1 Display?

    That will be equivalent to:
    -as display profile: it will validate your uncalibrated monitor against sRGB. It’s likely to be bad.
    -as simulation profile: it will validate how good your monitor is to work with color managed apps with sRGB images. Cyan and green may look worse than other colors (from 2D plot).

    IDNK if you can validate a display keeping current GPU calibration against sRGB or other standard/synth profile  (as “if” it was display profile). Older versions of DisplayCAL reseted GPU calibration when you try to do this. I’ve not tested what new versions do.

    I noticed in the monitor’s settings it does have a sRGB mode, would it help if I calibrated with that turned on?

    This is up to what Acer called “sRGB mode”. IDNK. Usually 2 options:
    -sRGB mode means white closer to D65 (but locked RGB gains), more neutral grey, gamma closer to sRGB or 2.2
    -sRGB mode means white closer to D65 (but locked RGB gains), more neutral grey, gamma closer to sRGB or 2.2 and gamut limited in lime green orange to match better sRGB (to be smaller). For color managed apps this does nothing, but for non color managed apps it could help.
    IDNK which one is using Acer. Measure coordinates of R G & B and check it (several ways of doing it: console log, profile verifcation…take a look on documentation). Last option feature was is unlikely to be in display of that price range in the past… but who knows

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by Vincent.
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