How should I set my monitor’s OSD menu before calibration?

Home Forums Help and Support How should I set my monitor’s OSD menu before calibration?

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #25306

    Sora-san
    Participant
    • Offline

    I have been using displaycal for calibration for several years.
    Now I notice that I always pay attention to the software settings, but seldom think about how to properly set the monitor’s OSD menu.I hope to get some help with that.
    Every time I start the correction, I will put the monitor back to its default settings.Then I will adjust the gamma, contrast, RGB and brightness in turn.

    I want to know:
    1. Should I keep the contrast at the default value? Or adjust it to the maximum value?

    2. When I adjust the RGB value, I can get multiple sets of values, which are all balanced (for example, 100-86-92, 50-43-46, and 66-57-61).
    Obviously different values correspond to different brightness, but do they have other effects?
    In fact, given any set of RGB values, any two options can be adjusted to achieve balance. How to adjust them to be the best? Or maybe this does not affect the correction.

    Thank you for answering this question.

    #25308

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    I have been using displaycal for calibration for several years.
    Now I notice that I always pay attention to the software settings, but seldom think about how to properly set the monitor’s OSD menu.I hope to get some help with that.
    Every time I start the correction, I will put the monitor back to its default settings.Then I will adjust the gamma, contrast, RGB and brightness in turn.

    I want to know:
    1. Should I keep the contrast at the default value? Or adjust it to the maximum value?

    Factory default “should” be native contrast, hence the recomended one

    2. When I adjust the RGB value, I can get multiple sets of values, which are all balanced (for example, 100-86-92, 50-43-46, and 66-57-61).
    Obviously different values correspond to different brightness, but do they have other effects?
    In fact, given any set of RGB values, any two options can be adjusted to achieve balance. How to adjust them to be the best? Or maybe this does not affect the correction.

    Thank you for answering this question.

    Some displays are 0-100 or 0-X with 100 or X the maximum value AND default value. For these ones, try to keep at least 1 channel at 100/X max value to maximuze contrast. “Usually” reliable monitors work with this naming convention.

    Some displays are 0-100 with a 50 default value or something like that. Rising value past some value X between 50-100 may clip that channel. Check with a gradient (smooth or with steps) if there is clipping

    #25318

    Sora-san
    Participant
    • Offline

    Thank you for replying me so quickly, I basically understand.

    My monitor is designed for photo editing, so I think its default value is exactly what you said. Now I know how to set up my monitor correctly  😀

    BTW, I see that you have discussed the “observer” in the software with others. I haven’t been very clear about which one to choose, I wonder if you are familiar with it?

    In my opinion, 10° is for large desktop monitors, and 2° is for small monitors such as laptop. Is my understanding correct?

    And I do not know the difference between CIE XXXX. I chose CIE2012 10° before. Which standard should I choose for an ordinary W-LED display?

    #25319

    Sora-san
    Participant
    • Offline

    I have been using displaycal for calibration for several years.
    Now I notice that I always pay attention to the software settings, but seldom think about how to properly set the monitor’s OSD menu.I hope to get some help with that.
    Every time I start the correction, I will put the monitor back to its default settings.Then I will adjust the gamma, contrast, RGB and brightness in turn.

    I want to know:
    1. Should I keep the contrast at the default value? Or adjust it to the maximum value?

    Factory default “should” be native contrast, hence the recomended one

    2. When I adjust the RGB value, I can get multiple sets of values, which are all balanced (for example, 100-86-92, 50-43-46, and 66-57-61).
    Obviously different values correspond to different brightness, but do they have other effects?
    In fact, given any set of RGB values, any two options can be adjusted to achieve balance. How to adjust them to be the best? Or maybe this does not affect the correction.

    Thank you for answering this question.

    Some displays are 0-100 or 0-X with 100 or X the maximum value AND default value. For these ones, try to keep at least 1 channel at 100/X max value to maximuze contrast. “Usually” reliable monitors work with this naming convention.

    Some displays are 0-100 with a 50 default value or something like that. Rising value past some value X between 50-100 may clip that channel. Check with a gradient (smooth or with steps) if there is clipping

    I am sorry that I am not familiar with the operation of the forum, my reply is on the upper floor.

    #25320

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Thank you for replying me so quickly, I basically understand.

    My monitor is designed for photo editing, so I think its default value is exactly what you said. Now I know how to set up my monitor correctly  😀

    No. Default factory contrast has nothing to do with a photo or a gaming monitor. It’s a feature of LCD displays with finite contrast window: given a white level, there is light leak with black input. There is a static contrast window and control electronics can lower it.

    If with default values you meant RGB gains for white, that is not true. You have to tweak them. “Some” factory presets may be clos to “some” whitepoint targets.

    BTW, I see that you have discussed the “observer” in the software with others. I haven’t been very clear about which one to choose, I wonder if you are familiar with it?

    In my opinion, 10° is for large desktop monitors, and 2° is for small monitors such as laptop. Is my understanding correct?

    And I do not know the difference between CIE XXXX. I chose CIE2012 10° before. Which standard should I choose for an ordinary W-LED display?

    CIE 1931 2 degree for all kind of displays. If you have another different displays and they do not match
    -try a suitable correction, or a better one
    -if still do not match, use visual whitepoint editor.

    #25324

    Sora-san
    Participant
    • Offline

    Thank you for replying me so quickly, I basically understand.

    My monitor is designed for photo editing, so I think its default value is exactly what you said. Now I know how to set up my monitor correctly  😀

    No. Default factory contrast has nothing to do with a photo or a gaming monitor. It’s a feature of LCD displays with finite contrast window: given a white level, there is light leak with black input. There is a static contrast window and control electronics can lower it.

    If with default values you meant RGB gains for white, that is not true. You have to tweak them. “Some” factory presets may be clos to “some” whitepoint targets.

    Got that.  But I am curious about the price of non-native contrast (such as maximum value)?

    BTW, I see that you have discussed the “observer” in the software with others. I haven’t been very clear about which one to choose, I wonder if you are familiar with it?

    In my opinion, 10° is for large desktop monitors, and 2° is for small monitors such as laptop. Is my understanding correct?

    And I do not know the difference between CIE XXXX. I chose CIE2012 10° before. Which standard should I choose for an ordinary W-LED display?

    CIE 1931 2 degree for all kind of displays. If you have another different displays and they do not match
    -try a suitable correction, or a better one
    -if still do not match, use visual whitepoint editor.

    That is to say, other observers are selected for color consistency of multiple displays? If I only need to use one monitor for work, the “default” CIE1932 2° is suitable for all cases.

    #25325

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Thank you for replying me so quickly, I basically understand.

    My monitor is designed for photo editing, so I think its default value is exactly what you said. Now I know how to set up my monitor correctly  😀

    No. Default factory contrast has nothing to do with a photo or a gaming monitor. It’s a feature of LCD displays with finite contrast window: given a white level, there is light leak with black input. There is a static contrast window and control electronics can lower it.

    If with default values you meant RGB gains for white, that is not true. You have to tweak them. “Some” factory presets may be clos to “some” whitepoint targets.

    Got that.  But I am curious about the price of non-native contrast (such as maximum value)?

    I do not understand. Native whitepoint and native static contrast ratio = maximum contrast in LCDs

    If you mean what will happen tweaking contrast OSD value… only manufacturer knows. Typical results may be overshoot issues or channel clipping.

    BTW, I see that you have discussed the “observer” in the software with others. I haven’t been very clear about which one to choose, I wonder if you are familiar with it?

    In my opinion, 10° is for large desktop monitors, and 2° is for small monitors such as laptop. Is my understanding correct?

    And I do not know the difference between CIE XXXX. I chose CIE2012 10° before. Which standard should I choose for an ordinary W-LED display?

    CIE 1931 2 degree for all kind of displays. If you have another different displays and they do not match
    -try a suitable correction, or a better one
    -if still do not match, use visual whitepoint editor.

    That is to say, other observers are selected for color consistency of multiple displays?

    No. CIE 2012 2 degree may be more accurate to the MEAN of human observers, but most software uses CIE 1931 2 degree.

    So it’s easier to visually match whitepoint ***if there was an issue for a particular person*** (to other display o to their own subjective “memory” of what D65 shpuld be) than to change everything

    • This reply was modified 2 days, 8 hours ago by Vincent.
    #25329

    Sora-san
    Participant
    • Offline

    I fully understand. Thank you for answering so many questions. Wish you a great day. 😀

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Log in or Register

Display Calibration and Characterization powered by ArgyllCMS