Discovered method to calibrate HTC VIVE + question

Home Forums General Discussion Discovered method to calibrate HTC VIVE + question

This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Florian Höch 4 months ago.

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  • #14421

    namefaceguy
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    Hi I wanted to share this with everyone since I looked on the internet and It seems like i’m the first person to discover how to calibrate an HTC Vive and then follow with a question.

    First you have to set the vive into extended mode or  in other words disable direct mode.  This allows you to see the HTC vive as a monitor in DisplayCal.  From there it gets very tricky and maybe others can help me test alternate methods.

    It’s seems the vives screen will turn off if it detects that it is sitting on a stable surface.   So channeling the willpower of a monk I decided to hold the calibrator and controller so that the screen would not turn off.  I have since found a power savings option that might work to stop this unfortunate behavior but in the meantime any non perfect moving object could work (maybe hanging from string or on a vibrating fan).  Also for your information I did a test and found my vive had a gamma of 2.19 and a white correlated color temperature of about 8500 with a visual color temperature of 7500.    The correct settings to me seems to be absolute 2.2 gamma or absolute 2.4 gamma since the HTC Vive is a OLED screen with infinite contrast ratio.  I calibrated to 2.4 since thats the actual standard and found that in many apps it looked better than the 2.2 since it’s likely that the color was calibrated for screens other than the vive beforehand.   This comes in handy for  watching movies in vr and also to make everything look far less washed out.   I hope you experiment with this yourself if you haven’t yet.  Calibration is even more important and impressive in virtual reality in my opinion  from my limited tests.

    My Question:  Is OLED intrinsically brightness dependent?   Or can i avoid switching on white level drift compensation?  I don’t think it has additional variable light technology enabled.
    Plus, the htc vive does not support hdr even though it is an OLED screen in a perfectly black environment.  Also when calibrated it displayed around 95% of DCI P3 so I’m also curious if I should try to calibrate it for hdr content anyways with it’s massive  color gamut.

    As always thanks Florian for your guidance and talent.

    #14455

    Florian Höch
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    My Question: Is OLED intrinsically brightness dependent?

    Most larger OLED screens (i.e. TVs) have some sort of brightness (power) limiting (even non HDR ones). As to whether or not that applies to the Vive, I can’t tell.

    #14457

    namefaceguy
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    Well after using the Vive far more I’m confident that there is no automatic brightness limiter.  I noticed no change in brightness and this makes sense since this is a gaming rig.  I watch movies and saw 0 reduction in brightness in dark scenes.

    I’m going to put a no on having to use white level drift compensation.

    I still need to fool around with this some more.  My biggest concern is whether the games are programmed for a different color temperature in mind or if the headsets vary greatly in color temperature.

    One more question:  If I change the temperature on an oled am I losing anything of value?  I know the contrast ratio is infinite so  I assume that by calibrating to 6500 k from 7500k  I would have slightly less bright whites but it wouldn’t really be noticeable.   Any input?

    #14489

    Florian Höch
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    I still need to fool around with this some more. My biggest concern is whether the games are programmed for a different color temperature in mind or if the headsets vary greatly in color temperature.

    Games usually have no notion of color management. When a game graphic designer cares about color, s/he will probably use a display calibrated to common video standard (Rec. 709 primaries, gamma 2.2 or BT.1886 TRC) or sRGB (same Rec. 709 primaries, but slightly different TRC near black) when working and viewing game art, which means D65 equivalent whitepoint.

    #14518

    namefaceguy
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    I know this is the case for normal games but  VR is unique since they are likely using either a vive or rift as the only target monitor.  If the monitor has known variables there would be no reason to not  consider the color being produced on the only means of playing the game this is why I want to know if the standard white temperature of HTC Vive devices is higher than 6500 or if mine is just deviant.  Hopefully someone see’s this who has a Vive and can do a quick test.

    #14529

    Florian Höch
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    If the monitor has known variables there would be no reason to not consider the color being produced on the only means of playing the game this is why I want to know if the standard white temperature of HTC Vive devices is higher than 6500 or if mine is just deviant.

    1. Color temperature on its own is not very meaningful since it only gives an idea of how cold (blueish) or warm (reddish/yellowish) a light source is, but ignores the direction of green. Thus, for color temperature to become more meaningful, it needs to be used to compute the correlated CIE x y chromaticity of a known spectrum like daylight (or blackbody), and then the actual measured x, y of the light source can be compared to that and it tells you something about the quality of the light source irrespective of the color temperature (a good quality light source will be close to a daylight spectrum of the given color temperature).
    2. Colorimeters are inherently limited for making assessments about white light quality since they use filters to derive CIE x y values and cannot measure spectral power distribution like a spectrometer can. Some colorimeters (e.g. i1D3, Klein K-10) are (notably) better in that regard (because they use high quality filters) than some others (e.g. Spyders, i1D2, Huey).
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