Checking uncalibrated colour accuracy

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  • This topic has 4 replies, 2 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by Rune.
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  • #30309

    Rune
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    Hi, I am a complete newbie and hope to get some help regarding my questions.

    I have two laptops home for evaluation, and I would like to pick the one that has the best colour accuracy and the widest colour gamut. I will use the laptop for photo editing.

    I have an X-Rite i1 Display Pro and installed latest version of Displaycal on both laptops.

    I am not interested in creating a calibration file, I just want a measurement report that tells me the colour accuracy and so on for these laptop displays.

    I don’t know where to find the saved calibration files so I just attached a screenshot of the .icm file.

    The colour accuracy numbers on the bottom seem too low to be realistic, are these from the uncalibrated display?

    Thanks in advance for any help.

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    #30314

    Vincent
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    -need an accurte spectral correction for laptop backlight, otherwise readings won’t be accurate
    As a general rule sRGB only or less : White LED correcton
    Widegamut led laptops can have a wide range of backlights. For a P3 display without adobeRGB green choose WLED PFS 95% p3 (filename Panasonic VVX…)
    These two are bundled in display cal, just import auto corrections from tools menu.
    To be sure you’ll need at least an xrite spectrophotometer and make a CCSS using high res mode (3nm)

    -One you have this pre requisite and you configured proper spectral correction on device tab, validate using a simulation profile to whatever “modes/preset” it has if any (Display P3 D65, sRGB… etc) and “check use simulation profile as display profile” (disabling whatever GPU calibration you have during test).
    If laptop has not a vendor app with “display modes”, just generate an ICC profile from EDID dada (File menu) or use the ICM provided by vendor (if it provides one) and validate against it.

    -As a general rule… it’s not wise to assume that wider gamut is better on a laptop.  Almost all of them will suffer banding after grey calibration in gpu (Displaycal/i1Profiler) because the GPU and mean color distance to true neutral grey in such banding errors will be bigger than in an sRGB screen. Also there are a lot of not color managed apps fro Windows so unless laptop vendor provides an app to simulate sRGB/rec709 you may find it not usable outside Photoshop and such.

    PS: that AUO looks like a ~P3 screen so i’ll use as an starting point WLED PFS 95% p3 panasonic VVX spectral correction. Import them in tools menu and select itin device tab.

    #30316

    Rune
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    Thanks for your advice Vincent, I appreciate it.

    Starting with the correction, how will I know for sure which is the correct one?

    My Asus laptop has an AU Optronics IPS panel, 100% DCI-P3, 500 nits and Pantone valkidated from the factory.

    So this should be pretty accurate out of the box. Choosing the Panasonic WLED correction, I can get a delta E value around 1.0 on the interactive display adjustment. I get this using the manual colour temperature adjustment slider in the Asus colour presets. I thought the Normal mode would be the Pantone validated one.

    However, switching to   the WLED IPS, 98% Adobe RGB /96 % P3 (HP Dreamcolor Z24x G2) correction gives a delta E value of only 0.2 on the interactive display adjustment. This time the best result was achieved using the Eye Care mode in Asus presets. See attached images for reference.

    My other laptop has an OLED display. I got the best results using  RGB OLED Family (Samsung Galaxy S7).

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    #30319

    Vincent
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    To be sure you’ll need at least an xrite spectrophotometer and make a CCSS using high res mode (3nm)

    Already explained

    Pantone valkidated from the factory.

    So this should be pretty accurate out of the box.

    No, not the way you think. All these out of the box certifications are tricky, 99% marketing.

    Choosing the Panasonic WLED correction, I can get a delta E value around 1.0 on the interactive display adjustment. I get this using the manual colour temperature adjustment slider in the Asus colour presets. I thought the Normal mode would be the Pantone validated one.

    However, switching to   the WLED IPS, 98% Adobe RGB /96 % P3 (HP Dreamcolor Z24x G2) correction gives a delta E value of only 0.2 on the interactive display adjustment. This time the best result was achieved using the Eye Care mode in Asus presets. See attached images for reference.

    No, it is not the one you like. It is the one (if it was an WLED PFS and we do not know for sure) that gives you X colorspace. Already explained, no AdobeRGB green it is not the HP one, period.

    My other laptop has an OLED display. I got the best results using  RGB OLED Family (Samsung Galaxy S7).

    Then it’s easy to decide which is the best one. Kick out the OLED. ABL will ruin all serious color work with common office amient light.

    #30322

    Rune
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    Thanks for your patience Vincent. I obviously have some studying to do, I will dive into the documentation and come back later with more educated questions 🙂

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