Calibrating without creating colorprofiles

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  • #27134

    Toni
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    Hello
    I’m new to this entire topic but because I’m about to buy a new monitor I wanted to spend some time in calibrating my old monitors so they would be a bit in sync with my new one. So I bought a SpyderX, but now I’m running in some issues.

    old Asus PA246 – Wide Color Gamut:
    It has different color profiles:
    -sRGB which looks ok but I can’t change any colors in the OSD and SpyderX says white is way to red (since I can’t change anything, I can’t use it)
    -UserColor which has a super bright (feels almost purple) red but I can change colors. So used this for calibration

    Issue:
    I changed the gain to get a perfect white, then I let the calibration process run though and and the reds were still “unpleasant”. Faces were too red. The new color profile made it even more red. If I disable the profile, its less red but still way to much. I’m now guessing the white is good but the greys are too red. I also run the validation system with lots of colors and it showed that everything is “good”.

    I’m not sure how much the “wide gamut” has an influence to this. Unfortunately there was no correction profile available for the Asus PA246.
    I actually expected that the measuring of the actual output colors and creating  the profile would solve all these issues. On top of that it seems using icc profiles for monitors is kinda unreliable as not every software supports it (as mentioned everywere already – and it looks like IrfanView does not care as well :/ )

    question:
    Since the Monitor has SixAxis Hue/Saturation, Offset and Gain settings, I was wondering if its possible to calibrate/improve the monitor without creating an icc profile? Maybe some mode which loops though different greys while I’m adjusting the sliders on the monitor to reach neutral values.

    Maybe I’m totally wrong about all this and there is an easy solution? 😛

    thanks for the help

    Toni

    SpyderX Pro on Amazon  
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    #27136

    MW
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    The ideal solution is easier and more accurate than your idea. Use the displays native gamut and use a quality colorimeter with a matching spectral correction matching your display to create a XYZLUT to use with color managed software.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by MW.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by MW.
    #27146

    Vincent
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    -Spyders are not very accurate, try to get an i1DisplaYpro.
    Your asus should be close to  DellU2410 / NEC PA241W. SpyderX is better that older Spyders by correction is LOCKED on device. Look for widegamut CCFL

    -sRGB/AdobeRGB preset can be corrected in white point using GPU. When displaycal says “too much X” ignore and continue with calibration. White will be corrected limiting 1/2 channel output on GPU. Banding may happen. Contrast will drop a little.

    “I changed the gain to get a perfect white, then I let the calibration process run though and and the reds were still “unpleasant”. Faces were too red. ”
    As MW said, if you move to a widegamut OSD mode, you’ll need colro managed software,. otherwise all will look oversaturated. It will happen to eon an eizo or a nec.
    GPU calibration ONLY fixes greys (including white). Color managed software will read display profile and traslate RGB values from image to another RGB values with the same color encoded in display colorspace.
    Try to read a little about profiles & color management.
    Some profiles like XYZLUT or Xrite’s table may be not compatible with some color managed apps. Use simple ones like single curve + matrix. Then check if accurate, if not enough accurate try XYZLUT.

    If you want that your widegamut display behaves like an sRGB in ALL apps, use sRGB factory mode + grey GPU calibration on top of it. That is the easy way.

    6axis  in user/custom mode can be used too. Download & use Displaycal “cousin” HCFR and try to get RGBCMY 255 close to rec709 in 0-255 full range.
    Measure->move 6axis->measure->move 6axis values->measure… etc

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Vincent.

    i1Display Pro on Amazon  
    Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

    #27311

    Toni
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    Thanks guys for all the help

    I kinda wanted to get away from the GPU color profiles. In the past I thought those color profiles would just be applied to the color right before the signal leaves the graphics card, so every pixel specific to the display output would be calibrated, no matter what content is actually shown. Does something like this exist?
    It is a bit weird that the app has to support this per app window and that it switches the color profiles once the center of the window moved to another screen.

    Hardware calibration inside the monitor seems to be a cool thing, but is obviously way too expensive.
    So I bought a benq PD3200Q and its sRGB mode looks quite good (as far as I can tell)

    For calibrating the old Asus I tried HCFR but it seams it does not support my SpyderX (not selectable)
    So I did a Measurement Report in DisplayCal and tried to give the Asus with Gain and Offset neutral greys.
    Thats the best I was able to get. (for some reason measurement on full black and full white is totally off) Fotos look on Asus and Benq now similar which is enough for me

    Because I was curious how it looked on the benq, I did the same grey test for it and for some reason the graph is totally off, but the image looks good. So I guess the SpyderX just gets confused with this panel for some reason.

    I also now realized that the gradients on the Asus a now not smooth anymore. I guess its because I’m messing with a wide gamut and manually try to squeeze into the sRGB

    but I understand that sRGB mode + color profiles is the way to get some actual good results.

    thank you

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Toni.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Toni.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Toni.
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    #27319

    MW
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    I’m not a 100% but I recall system-wide calibration only exists for Linux and MacOS, with some limitations. If you wanna take the GPU out of the equation you can simply set tone cure to as measured. Color-manged profiles will still provide full correction.

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