Best preset for RAW processing.

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  • #2308

    HarryYTM
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    I mainly use Canon Digital Photo Professional on my desktop PC to process RAW files from my Canon DSLR, such as correcting whitebalance, do some fine tune, and then upload the converted photo to website for sharing, or print the photo for giveaway.

    May I ask which preset can give me the most accurate color for RAW processing?

    I am currently using sRGB preset with Spyder 4 to calibrate the cheap Philips IPS monitor I am using. Is there any need to calibrate the monitor to sRGB for sharing photo on website?  Or I should use Default(Gamma 2.2) preset instead?

    • This topic was modified 6 years, 8 months ago by HarryYTM.
    • This topic was modified 6 years, 8 months ago by HarryYTM.
    • This topic was modified 6 years, 8 months ago by HarryYTM.
    #2321

    Florian Höch
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    If print-to-screen matching is desired, depending if you have set up a dedicated way to view the prints, you’ll likely want to match the display whitepoint to the illumination used to view the prints (usually around roughly 5000-6000K depending on the lighting). The calibration tone curve isn’t all that important in color managed applications, it affects non-color-managed applications and the desktop (under Windows, under Mac OS X the desktop is color managed). sRGB is a reasonable calibration tone curve choice if you work a lot with sRGB  material and want to match the tonality (distribution of lightness, not color) in non-color-managed vs managed applications. Otherwise, the default of gamma 2.2 should work just as well. In your case, as you already have calibrated to sRGB, there’s probably no change required there.

    #2331

    HarryYTM
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    1. Do I need to follow sRGB standard to publish photo to the web or printing photo?

    2. There is a Color Matching setting for display in DPP4, which one should I set to? sRGB or the icc file created by DisplayCAL?

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    #2334

    Florian Höch
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    Do I need to follow sRGB standard to publish photo to the web

    It’s a reasonable default as most screens today are still sRGB-ish in gamut, so photos should at least look somewhat reasonable on non-color managed systems (but there are no guarantees).

    Do I need to follow sRGB standard to […] printing photo?

    Depends. If you’re printing yourself, you have full control over the process, so there’s no need to limit yourself to sRGB (although nothing wrong with it either if the photos “fit” inside the sRGB gamut).

     There is a Color Matching setting for display in DPP4, which one should I set to?

    “Use OS setting” is probably the right choice.

    #2701

    HarryYTM
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    I calibrate my monitor for RAW files post-processing, such as correcting white-balance, exposure, adjusting contrast, highlight and shadow, and then upload to Flickr for sharing or print out the photo.

    May I ask should I apply ambient light correction in DisplayCAL setting to calibrate my display for such purpose?

    Another question is if I should apply ambient lighting correction, do I have to do measurement again for each lighting condition? Or I can use existing measurements to create different lighting condition afterwards.

    Final question is should I use the monitor RGB offset to meet sRGB D65 white point or leave it default and let DisplayCAl to deal with the white point for best calibration result?

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 7 months ago by HarryYTM.
    #2703

    HarryYTM
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    Two more questions, on what condition I should use “Update calibration”?

    Should I use the RGB offset setting to adjust the white point to meet D65 before using “Update calibration”? Or leave the RGB offset as is and let DisplayCAL to “Update calibration”?

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 7 months ago by HarryYTM.
    #2707

    Florian Höch
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    May I ask should I apply ambient light correction in DisplayCAL setting to calibrate my display for such purpose?

    Another question is if I should apply ambient lighting correction […]

    No, both of these settings only affect non-color-managed applications.

    Final question is should I use the monitor RGB offset to meet sRGB D65 white point […]

    Many monitors use dithering internally, so adjusting the RGB gains in the monitor itself may lead to less banding than relying on the graphics card videoLUTs (which may be limited to 8 bits of precision without dithering).

    Two more questions, on what condition I should use “Update calibration”?

    It’s of limited use because it assumes that only the gray balance/whitepoint drifts over time, and all color in relation to it. It is useful though if you find that your whitepoint has drifted and don’t want to run through a full set of profiling measurements, in which case updating the calibration saves a good amount of time compared to a full set of measurements.

    #7046

    Eric
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    The calibration tone curve isn’t all that important in color managed applications, it affects non-color-managed applications and the desktop (under Windows, under Mac OS X the desktop is color managed).

    Hello Florian, just a quick follow-up question, can the same be said of the whitepoint color temperature? I originally wanted to ask why bother with calibration if profiling can (more or less) guarantee accurate colors to be displayed in color-managed applications. Thanks!

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 6 months ago by Eric.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 6 months ago by Eric.
    #7049

    Florian Höch
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    Hello Florian, just a quick follow-up question, can the same be said of the whitepoint color temperature?

    In a way, yes. The white point should match your room illumination (but for practical considerations, the latter should not have below roughly 5000K CCT, so while e.g. incandscent has a high CRI, it is not very suitable for color critical work with few exceptions).

    I originally wanted to ask why bother with calibration if profiling can (more or less) guarantee accurate colors to be displayed in color-managed applications. Thanks!

    Depends. As the human eye is very good at making out color casts in neutrals, calibration helps remove them from the surrounding UI in color managed apps (where typically only some window contents are color managed), and acts as a sort of pre-linearization which can aid profiling.

    #7100

    Eric
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    Depends. As the human eye is very good at making out color casts in neutrals, calibration helps remove them from the surrounding UI in color managed apps (where typically only some window contents are color managed), and acts as a sort of pre-linearization which can aid profiling.

    I did a little experiment and was able to understand that the tone curve setting is a calibration (software means via the video card’s LUT) independent of profiling (although embedded in the ICC profile anyway). Whether I set it to 1.8 or 2.6, reference images displayed using a color-managed application such as Photoshop would look the same. I understand that what the ICC profile describes is the monitor in its calibrated state.

    However, I’m a bit confused with the whitepoint color temperature. I understand it’s also a calibration on top of which profiling is performed. But if sRGB is supposed to be 6500K and I calibrated my monitor to 5000K, wouldn’t it be the case that there will be no way a 6500K white can be displayed on a monitor calibrated to 5000K? Therefore, would it be correct to say that despite being ICC-profile aware, Photoshop will never be able to display the photo according to what the author intended to?

    #7102

    Florian Höch
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    But if sRGB is supposed to be 6500K and I calibrated my monitor to 5000K, wouldn’t it be the case that there will be no way a 6500K white can be displayed on a monitor calibrated to 5000K?

    In Photoshop that is true, but it is not really an issue: Chromatic adaptation makes the colors look correct with respect to the different whitepoint, and that is all you should really care about.

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