Ambient light compensation?

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  • #4625

    Gregow
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    What is the reasoning behind this?

    You’re using a IPS display in a dark environment, the displays contrast ratio could be a larger factor than the ambient lightning. A slightly higher gamma makes the displays output appear more contrasty which would help you hold back from using too much contrast when processing photos.

    I’m with you so far. What I’m wondering is how you arrived at those particular settings?

    @gregow

    1. Why 80 cdm/2 when you’re not strictly following the sRGB standard?

    2. It begs the question, have you considered how display technology changes with time? As for the art, currently browsing flickr or 500px you will see many photos with raised blacks. For the sake of argument let’s assume it’s a stylistic trend. Can you rule out higher factory gammas of recent Apple devices playing a part? Could a photos with raised blacks look normal on displays with crushed blacks? Bottom line, are you concerned that your photos to look dated 5-10 years from now?

    Perhaps these questions were meant for Steve and not me? I prefer to have my display set at 120cd/m2. As for the second question I would like to come visually close to sRGB (meaning, some compensation for a darkened environment if possible). It’s the closest we have to a standard, though very few would actually follow it.

    #4636

    MW
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    Sorry, I misread your reply. Still you’re dealing with a moving target. You want your photos to look right on current consumer devices while adhering in part to a standard created for legacy devices. Just providing some points you may want to consider, hopefully we can all learn something. You could try a slightly high gamma like 2.3 and perhaps raise black output offset away from 0 to simulate a bit of black crush. I’ve never considered ambient illumination, it seems the displays contrast ratio is the limiting factor but I haven’t explored this in depth, merely observed that changes in ambient lightning doesn’t effect how I distinguish shades of near-black. Only now do I realize I shouldn’t ignore CIECAM02 gamut mapping.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by MW.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by MW.
    #4639

    MW
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    What is the reasoning behind this?

    You’re using a IPS display in a dark environment, the displays contrast ratio could be a larger factor than the ambient lightning. A slightly higher gamma makes the displays output appear more contrasty which would help you hold back from using too much contrast when processing photos.

    I’m with you so far. What I’m wondering is how you arrived at those particular settings?

    From trial and error average gamma 2.3 looks right the widest range of content subjectively. The same for 100 cd/m2 that I use. Coincidentally it’s close the average of various display standards from DCI-P3 to Adobe RGB. Black output offset: 0% provides BT.1886-like gamma expansion near black and should make my work ready for future display technologies which are moving toward higher contrast ratios.

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