DisplayCAL vs. X-Rite Software

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This topic contains 20 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Shoghi Shams (@shoghi) 2 years ago.

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  • #8045

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
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    Hi!

    I recently purchased an X-Rite ColorMunki Display and have been playing around with calibrating my Dell XPS 15 9560 and have been getting different results between the X-Rite software and DisplayCAL.

    Not sure if it’ll matter, but the Dell XPS 15 9560 is the touch enabled 4K model, which has a wide gaumet display (nearly 100% sRGB and AdobeRGB).

    DisplayCAL takes considerably longer than the X-Rite software’s 5 minute calibration time, and it produces a brighter and less orange final result. The X-Rite software calibrates it VERY, VERY dark and very orange. I tested this out by editing a photo in Lightroom and viewing it using different monitors and devices and immediately I can tell exposure is all wrong. DisplayCAL produces a much brighter and less orange final result.

    If we’re talking preference here, I 100% prefer the DisplayCAL results, but I want to be sure it is also accurate as well. Why would there be such a huge difference in calibration time and final result? Am I doing something wrong here, perhaps a setting?

    Thanks for the help!

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by  Shoghi Shams.

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    #8047

    S Simeonov (@s-simeonov)
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    Hi!

    I recently purchased an X-Rite ColorMunki Display and have been playing around with calibrating my Dell XPS 15 9560 and have been getting different results between the X-Rite software and DisplayCAL.

    Not sure if it’ll matter, but the Dell XPS 15 9560 is the touch enabled 4K model, which has a wide gaumet display (nearly 100% sRGB and AdobeRGB).

    DisplayCAL takes considerably longer than the X-Rite software’s 5 minute calibration time, and it produces a brighter and less orange final result. The X-Rite software calibrates it VERY, VERY dark and very orange. I tested this out by editing a photo in Lightroom and viewing it using different monitors and devices and immediately I can tell exposure is all wrong. DisplayCAL produces a much brighter and less orange final result.

    If we’re talking preference here, I 100% prefer the DisplayCAL results, but I want to be sure it is also accurate as well. Why would there be such a huge difference in calibration time and final result? Am I doing something wrong here, perhaps a setting?

    Thanks for the help!

    I would personally use only displaycal, I wouldn’t trust the x-rite software.

    #8050

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
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    I would personally use only displaycal, I wouldn’t trust the x-rite software.

    Really?? How would X-Rite get away with having a software that isn’t trustworthy? When I launched up DisplayCAL, I was expecting similar results with X-Rite. Figured DisplayCAL would take it further with the accuracy, but the difference between the two is night and day.

    #8051

    S Simeonov (@s-simeonov)
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    I would personally use only displaycal, I wouldn’t trust the x-rite software.

    Really?? How would X-Rite get away with having a software that isn’t trustworthy? When I launched up DisplayCAL, I was expecting similar results with X-Rite. Figured DisplayCAL would take it further with the accuracy, but the difference between the two is night and day.

    Indeed, displaycal is much more accurate than the x-rite software, it takes more time to calibrate, but it’s worth it. 🙂

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by  S Simeonov.
    #8053

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
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    Indeed, displaycal is much more accurate than the x-rite software, it takes more time to calibrate, but it’s worth it. 🙂

    I’m definitely not concerned with the calibration time. I could take all night for all I care, as long as I get accurate results.

    Upon doing some quick research, DisplayCAL is pretty much king. I’m just very suspicious of the result differences. I just want to make sure I got my display as accurate as possible.

    What about the “Settings” drop down options? Do I need to concern myself with those? Do I just leave it on Default, or should I use Laptop on a laptop, or perhaps sRGB for photography for the web?

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by  Shoghi Shams.
    #8060

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
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    I was also wondering if there were specific settings I should be using as a photographer and videographer who will be posting mostly on the web, very little print? I also have a wide gaumet display on the XPS 15. Do I need to be concerned about settings for my laptop?

    #8075

    Florian Höch (@fhoech)
    Administrator
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    Upon doing some quick research, DisplayCAL is pretty much king. I’m just very suspicious of the result differences.

    If you use the same settings in different software, which means same colorimeter correction (display type in X-Rite i1 Profiler), white point target, calibration tone curve, then results are usually very close to one another.

    What about the “Settings” drop down options? Do I need to concern myself with those?

    These are just a few quick and easy presets for specific use cases. Defaults should work well.

    Do I need to be concerned about settings for my laptop?

    Only in the sense that Laptops usually do not have RGB gain controls, so to match the whitepoint to your other monitor’s white, you would need to use the visual whitepoint editor.

    #8081

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
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    If you use the same settings in different software, which means same colorimeter correction (display type in X-Rite i1 Profiler), white point target, calibration tone curve, then results are usually very close to one another.

    These are just a few quick and easy presets for specific use cases. Defaults should work well.

    Only in the sense that Laptops usually do not have RGB gain controls, so to match the whitepoint to your other monitor’s white, you would need to use the visual whitepoint editor.

    Hey! Thanks so much for the reply! I’m still trying to understand everything that is involved in the calibration process. I’m still not understanding a few things.

    1. In the X-Rite software, I don’t recall ever getting very many options for settings customization, even with all the advanced settings enabled. As far as I can see, both used the same brightness (120) and white at 6500K. Even with, what appears to be very similar settings, the X-Rite one still produces a completely different calibration result, which is why I’m concerned.
    2. I was advised to use the Laptop preset, since I don’t have OSD settings for my Dell XPS. The ONLY way I can change RGB settings is through the Intel Graphics driver software. I was advised against using any other software than DisplayCAL, since DisplayCAL would have overridden all other settings. Is this not correct?
    3. Visual Whitepoint Editor? Can you elaborate a  bit on this? I’m not really concerned about my other displays. I just want my laptop display accurate for photography editing. Does DisplayCAL not make RGB changes automatically?
    #8082

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
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    Upon doing some quick research, DisplayCAL is pretty much king. I’m just very suspicious of the result differences.

    If you use the same settings in different software, which means same colorimeter correction (display type in X-Rite i1 Profiler), white point target, calibration tone curve, then results are usually very close to one another.

    What about the “Settings” drop down options? Do I need to concern myself with those?

    These are just a few quick and easy presets for specific use cases. Defaults should work well.

    Do I need to be concerned about settings for my laptop?

    Only in the sense that Laptops usually do not have RGB gain controls, so to match the whitepoint to your other monitor’s white, you would need to use the visual whitepoint editor.

    I have Dell’s PremiumColor software disabled, but installed. I also have the Intel Graphics driver and nVidia driver installed for my Intel 630 and GTX 1050.

    As far as I can tell, the nVidia software doesn’t have any color settings. PremiumColor has many color settings, as does the Intel Graphics software. Do I need to uninstall any of these? I have the Intel settings set to default, but default has “vivid colors” instead of “natural colors”. Should I uninstall a software that is packages with a piece of my hardware? Would DisplayCAL override all other software settings?

    #8087

    Florian Höch (@fhoech)
    Administrator
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    As far as I can see, both used the same brightness (120) and white at 6500K

    They need to use the exact same colorimeter correction (display type in i1 Profiler) as well.

    The ONLY way I can change RGB settings is through the Intel Graphics driver software.

    Adjusting RGB gains in software will interfere with calibration.

    Visual Whitepoint Editor?

    See the documentation and FAQ.

    #8089

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
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    As far as I can see, both used the same brightness (120) and white at 6500K

    They need to use the exact same colorimeter correction (display type in i1 Profiler) as well.

    The ONLY way I can change RGB settings is through the Intel Graphics driver software.

    Adjusting RGB gains in software will interfere with calibration.

    Visual Whitepoint Editor?

    See the documentation and FAQ.

    Hey man. Thanks for the reply. I am clearly a newbie regarding this matter. I didn’t really understand half the things you said there.

    1. When you say “colormeter correction” do you mean that my hardware requires correction before calibrating my display? I did a search for i1 Profiler and I see that it is something that I can be installed via the X-Rite website. Is this something I require? I have uninstalled all X-Rite software from my laptop.
    2. I don’t make any RGB adjustments with software. That said, my laptop has no other way to change RGB settings. My laptop has no OSD settings, so how would I make the RGB adjustments without a piece of software? I did some research into the Visual Whitepoint Editor you mentioned and it looks like I can make quite a bit of changes through this section, but how do I know what values are accurate? If I am understanding the instructions, I am supposed to key in the values for the colors, then place my device over the display, then hit measure, it’ll then set those values to calibrate around. Is that correct?
    3. If software interferes with calibration, am I required to uninstall? The only software that is of any concern is the  Intel Graphics software, which has quite extensive color settings options. I don’t see an easy way to uninstall this software, nor does it feel like a good idea. Like I mentioned before, the “default” settings on the Intel Graphics setting is “vivid” not “natural”. Is this something I need to work around? Can displayCAL override the Intel settings?

    Thanks again for all your help man!

    #8102

    Florian Höch (@fhoech)
    Administrator
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    When you say “colormeter correction” do you mean that my hardware requires correction before calibrating my display?

    See the documentation.

    I did a search for i1 Profiler and I see that it is something that I can be installed via the X-Rite website. Is this something I require?

    No.

    I don’t make any RGB adjustments with software. That said, my laptop has no other way to change RGB settings. My laptop has no OSD settings, so how would I make the RGB adjustments without a piece of software?

    You don’t – just skip the interactive adjustment.

    I did some research into the Visual Whitepoint Editor you mentioned and it looks like I can make quite a bit of changes through this section, but how do I know what values are accurate?

    The idea is that you match the whitepoint of another display visually.

    If software interferes with calibration, am I required to uninstall? The only software that is of any concern is the Intel Graphics software, which has quite extensive color settings options

    All settings need to be set in a neutral “do nothing” position.

    #8114

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
    Participant
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    When you say “colormeter correction” do you mean that my hardware requires correction before calibrating my display?

    See the documentation.

    I did a search for i1 Profiler and I see that it is something that I can be installed via the X-Rite website. Is this something I require?

    No.

    I don’t make any RGB adjustments with software. That said, my laptop has no other way to change RGB settings. My laptop has no OSD settings, so how would I make the RGB adjustments without a piece of software?

    You don’t – just skip the interactive adjustment.

    I did some research into the Visual Whitepoint Editor you mentioned and it looks like I can make quite a bit of changes through this section, but how do I know what values are accurate?

    The idea is that you match the whitepoint of another display visually.

    If software interferes with calibration, am I required to uninstall? The only software that is of any concern is the Intel Graphics software, which has quite extensive color settings options

    All settings need to be set in a neutral “do nothing” position.

    Alright! I’m back! I read the entire Documentation section of your website and have some additional questions.

    1. Colorimeter Corrections: I use a ColorMunki Display and when it set it up the first time I was prompted with the option to load corrections from X-Rite. Once I did that I had a bunch of “Spectral” options appear under Correction. I believe this is what you were referring to? In that list, I see: “Spectral: LCD CCFL Wide Gamut IPS (WG CCFL NEC241 271)”, which is the only thing that mentions Wide Gamet. My laptop, the Dell XPS 15, I believe has a Sharp IGZO display. Would the Wide Gamut correction work for my display? I didn’t see anything in the database under Sharp or Dell that matched.
    2. I followed your instructions and skipped the interactive adjustment and proceeded to calibrate. Once it was done, I noticed there was a “test calibration” option and I tried it. I got results that sound like calibration failed? Am I understanding this wrong? This is the result I got:

    21:37:10,809 Brightness error = 4.681061 cd/m^2 (is 124.681061, should be 120.000000)
    21:37:10,809 White point error = 4.150757 deltaE
    21:37:10,811 Maximum neutral error (@ 0.796124) = 5.481981 deltaE
    21:37:10,811 Average neutral error = 2.986682 deltaE

    3. When you say “neutral ‘do nothing’ position”, do you mean just set to software defaults, or do I actual set it to neutral? Those are two different things with the Intel HD Graphics software.

    #8121

    Shoghi Shams (@shoghi)
    Participant
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    When you say “colormeter correction” do you mean that my hardware requires correction before calibrating my display?

    See the documentation.

    I did a search for i1 Profiler and I see that it is something that I can be installed via the X-Rite website. Is this something I require?

    No.

    I don’t make any RGB adjustments with software. That said, my laptop has no other way to change RGB settings. My laptop has no OSD settings, so how would I make the RGB adjustments without a piece of software?

    You don’t – just skip the interactive adjustment.

    I did some research into the Visual Whitepoint Editor you mentioned and it looks like I can make quite a bit of changes through this section, but how do I know what values are accurate?

    The idea is that you match the whitepoint of another display visually.

    If software interferes with calibration, am I required to uninstall? The only software that is of any concern is the Intel Graphics software, which has quite extensive color settings options

    All settings need to be set in a neutral “do nothing” position.

    So I decided to play around the last day or so and have tried a few different settings and have obtained a couple measurement reports, but I have no idea how to read them. All I can see is the red letters saying “NOT OKAY”. I’ve tried twice, one with the LCD CCFL Wide Gamet correction and one on Auto, slightly different whitepoints, but both yielded very similar measurement reports. Did my monitor not calibrate??

    Please see attached for reports. Thanks!

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    #8136

    Florian Höch (@fhoech)
    Administrator
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    Colorimeter Corrections: I use a ColorMunki Display and when it set it up the first time I was prompted with the option to load corrections from X-Rite. Once I did that I had a bunch of “Spectral” options appear under Correction. I believe this is what you were referring to?

    Yes.

    In that list, I see: “Spectral: LCD CCFL Wide Gamut IPS (WG CCFL NEC241 271)”, which is the only thing that mentions Wide Gamet. My laptop, the Dell XPS 15, I believe has a Sharp IGZO display. Would the Wide Gamut correction work for my display?

    Modern displays (anything manufactured in the past years) aren’t using CCFL backlights anymore. I suspect some type of LED backlight, but not white LED (which would limit the gamut to roughly sRGB). In case you can’t find information of the exact type of backlight used (or how it compares to an existing technology), use no correction.

    I followed your instructions and skipped the interactive adjustment and proceeded to calibrate. Once it was done, I noticed there was a “test calibration” option and I tried it. I got results that sound like calibration failed?

    Is the display automatically dimming?

    When you say “neutral ‘do nothing’ position”, do you mean just set to software defaults, or do I actual set it to neutral? Those are two different things with the Intel HD Graphics software.

    Sorry, I wouldn’t know, because I don’t have Intel graphics hard or software.

    So I decided to play around the last day or so and have tried a few different settings and have obtained a couple measurement reports, but I have no idea how to read them. All I can see is the red letters saying “NOT OKAY”.

    You’re verifying against ProPhoto RGB, which is an excessively large gamut that will never be covered in full by any real device because it contains colors that are imaginary (not real). Verify against something else (e.g. sRGB).

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