BENQ Sw2700pt ??

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Vincent (@vincent) 3 weeks, 4 days ago.

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  • #17707

    HFelix (@hfelix)
    Participant
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    Hello I’ve read several posts regarding the BenQ sw2700pt monitor. I’m new to displaycal calibration. Basically I just want to be clear on how to properly calibrate this monitor. I want to use it for Resolve, I am using it as GUI monitor, I’ve read the instructions on how to…but what I’m confused about, is what correction setting should I be using? I have calibrated it following instructions from other threads on here. I’ve been using the RGBLED setting for correction, but when I create the LUT for resolve my export seems more on the warmer than what I see on my monitor?? I know this is not a reference monitor, but I’m trying to get a close match? What am I missing?

    #17709

    Vincent (@vincent)
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    SW2700PT is a QLED. There is no “vendor” correction available from Xrite or Datacolor for such backlight (AFAIK)

    Benq and its (faulty) software for SW-series “Palette Master Elements” uses Xrite’s RGBLED correction for measuring your display with an i1d3 colorimeter.

    All community corrections available here are faulty:
    https://colorimetercorrections.displaycal.net/?get&type=ccss&manufacturer_id=BNQ&display=BenQ%20SW2700&instrument=i1%20DisplayPro%2C%20ColorMunki%20Display%2C%20Spyder4&html=1
    They were made with a sRGB or AdobeRGB gamut emulation.

    You can manually “clean” the AdobeRGB ones (2 from i1Pro), just clean the contribution from green channel to red channel. Data is text, order should be WRGB, so you should modify/clean 2nd row of data from 500nm to ~575nm.

    This way you’ll get a clean native gamut CCSS correction for graphic arts QLED displays like yours.

    What can you do? Several options, a few examples:

    a ) Move to OSD “User” or “Custom”, the one with RGB gains available in OSD. Use the “good” correction modified by you or RGBLED.
    Get D65 white using gains with the help of DisplayCAL. Modify that white manually if it does not look “white” to you (specially if you use RGBLED correction which is not accurate for your backligt)
    Once you have a visual white near D65, calibrate and profile, make LUT3D for Resolve.. etc… but if you modified white to get a “whiter visual match” you must set white target “as measured / native”, not D65 coordinates (and relative colorimetric approach)

    b )  Use Benq’s Palette Master Elements, get a native gamut D65 hardware calibration (if you can).
    Then go to DisplayCAL, use RGBLED correction or the “Good one” edited by you, verify white.
    If white is OK in numbers and visually, use DisplayCAL to get LUT3D… etc.
    If white is not OK visually or numerically apply the same as in a ) but here you cannot use RGB gains in OSD so any attempt to get a visual match to D65 should be done with “visual white point editor”.

    c ) DEMAND that Benq includes a proper correction for their HW calibration software in their SW-series (QLED and graphic arts W-LED PFS displays), then use a “not faulty” Palette Master Elements.
    If owners do not complain the chances that they will modify their faulty software is zero.

    i1Basic Pro 2 on Amazon  
    Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

    #17714

    Florian Höch (@fhoech)
    Administrator
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    I think most people will be overwhelmed making changes to CCSS files, even considering it’s a text format. There is too much margin for error, and small mistakes can lead to unpleasant surprises later on.

    I’ve taken the “BenQ SW2700 (i1 Pro 2)_Spectral-Unknown.ccss” 3.3nm file and zeroed the green spectra between 370 and 575 nm (I think the blue contribution is also not correct for native). If my assumptions are correct, this should match more or less closely the SW2700’s native response. The adjusted file is attached.

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    #17719

    Vincent (@vincent)
    Participant
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    I’ve taken the “BenQ SW2700 (i1 Pro 2)_Spectral-Unknown.ccss” 3.3nm file and zeroed the green spectra between 370 and 575 nm (I think the blue contribution is also not correct for native).

    I forgot that one!

    #17748

    HFelix (@hfelix)
    Participant
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    Thank you for your input, it really helped.  The last question is…How do I modify or clean CCSS??

    “You can manually “clean” the AdobeRGB ones (2 from i1Pro), just clean the contribution from green channel to red channel. Data is text, order should be WRGB, so you should modify/clean 2nd row of data from 500nm to ~575nm.”

    #17750

    Vincent (@vincent)
    Participant
    • Offline

    Thank you for your input, it really helped.  The last question is…How do I modify or clean CCSS??

    “You can manually “clean” the AdobeRGB ones (2 from i1Pro), just clean the contribution from green channel to red channel. Data is text, order should be WRGB, so you should modify/clean 2nd row of data from 500nm to ~575nm.”

    Florian has done it for you.

    If you wish to try/learn:
    -copy 4 rows of spectral data to a clean text file (notepad or whatever you use)
    -delete “row” index, the first number of each row, save that new text file
    -import that text file in a spreadsheet as CSV (you may have to replace blank spaces ” ” with “,” or “;” depending on localization of your spreadsheet program
    -add a row above them and make a “series” from starting wavelegth with “3.3333” incremente for 3.3nm or “10” fto 10nm samples.
    -now you have labeled each wavelength, modify whatever ou need
    -save as CSV
    -edit that CSV: remove 1st row with wavelength, replace back blank spaces from “,” or “;” separator, replace decimal separator (form “,” to “.” depending in your localization), add row index to each spectral data row (“1”, “2”,…)
    -open CCSS in a text file, replace spectral data with the “corrected” one.

    Since spreadsheet software can plot 2D plots you can see what you did before saving.

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