Which one is correct? I compared 11 products.

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  • #140017

    AytacFx
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    PS: During tests, a few professionals pointed out that there weren’t significant differences between X-rate and SpyderX, proving it through measurements. I’m aware that the forum leans a bit towards favoring the X-rate brand. Please consider this comment and don’t overlook this issue. I used Spyder program and DisplayCAL but get same results.

    I’ve informed SpyderX support about this issue. I’ll share their responses with you too.

    Hi there,

    I’ve got a question about adjusting my screen settings.

    Here are the devices I’m using:

    • iiyama prolite XUB2792QSU-B1
    • Apple Macbook Pro 13″ M1
    • iPhone 13
    • SpyderX Pro

    When I use SpyderX to calibrate my iiyama Prolite screen, I get similar colors and settings as my old screens. Comparing these calibrated results with my iPhone 13 screen, I see nearly the same colors. The Magenta and Green settings (white balance) look good, and the colors and brightness seem right. The Kelvin setting in my test measurements shows 6500K. RGB slider: R: 97, G: 98, B: 100.

    But, when I try to calibrate the Macbook Pro 13″ screen using SpyderX, setting it to 6500 Kelvin, the colors turn completely ‘magenta’. Even the grays become totally magenta. Leaving the Kelvin setting as ‘as measured,’ the colors seem more accurate, and the test measurements show it’s at 6700K.

    As we know, the new Macbook Pro 14/16-inch screens have been praised a lot, even saying their factory settings are excellent. To compare these screens with my iPhone 13 (which is very similar to my iiyama Prolite screen), I went to a store. I placed the following products side by side:

    • MacBook 13″, 14″ & 16″ XDR, iMac 24″, iPad, and iPad Pro. All M1+ products.
    • All devices had features like True Tone turned off.

    I checked a familiar reference photo I edited. The colors and white balances looked the same across all these devices. Then, I opened the same photo on my iPhone 13 and compared it with these screens. Note again that the iPhone 13 screen matches my calibrated iiyama prolite screen. However, when compared to my iPhone 13, the laptops and iPads in the store tend towards ‘magenta’ while my iPhone 13 leans towards ‘green’. There were significant differences.

    When I returned home and checked my iPhone 13 with my iiyama Prolite monitor again, I found my iPhone 13 matched my monitor.

    After testing with my friends’ 2x iPhone 13s and an iPhone 15, I found their colors matched also with my iiyama Prolite and iPhone 13.

    Now, I’m confused about which one is right:

    iiyama Prolite + SpyderX = Matches iPhone 13, seems correct to me (Standard LED calibration).

    Macbook Pro 13″ + SpyderX = At 6500K, poor results with Magenta and saturation (W-LED), ‘as measured’ provides ideal results, but it’s not reliable for editing because it doesn’t match with 6500K kelvin.

    Even though all six devices in store give the same results, despite Apple screens being closest to calibrated screens, should I still trust my iiyama Prolite at home?

    Why do I get poor results calibrating the Macbook Pro 13″ to 6500 Kelvin? Could it be because it lacks an RGB slider?

    When I watch calibration tutorials on YouTube, everyone seems to do it without noticing any issues, but forums have conflicting opinions. Are people not noticing these problems? They are just happy. Is it related to advertising? 🙂

    I’ve been reading the internet for months, but I haven’t reached a conclusion yet. Hopefully, your experience can help me and others with similar issues.

    Thank you.

    SpyderX Pro on Amazon  
    Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

    #140028

    violetleaf
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    I think you’ll find that most on this forum will lean toward X-Rite for the reasons described in this post

    Hardware Calibration SpyderX Pro vs i1 Dispay Studio

    One key question you’ll need to answer is exactly what spectral correction are you using? I’m not sure what is even available to the Spyder device, and whether it even has spectral corrections for wide gamut panels like the one in the Macbook which likely uses a PFS Phosphor LED.  You may not be able to trust the CCT values you’re getting with the Spyder on that panel at least. Not sure about the iiyama one, it may use a simple White LED but I have no idea.

    #140029

    AytacFx
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    I’m using the “Standard LED” option for the iiyama screen, and for the Macbook Pro 13″ screen, “W-LED” is selected. Spyder support had confirmed this setup in the past.

    An email I received from support a year ago states:

    “Iiyama Prolite XUB2792QSU-B1 W-LED stands for white LED backlight. NOT wide LED display technology = 90% + of AdobeRGB gamut. Select ‘Standard LED’ for the display technology in the Spyder software.”

    Your 2020 MacBook Pro: Select “Wide LED” for the display technology in the Spyder software.

    The available calibration options I’m seeing are as follows, and I’ve included a screenshot of the screen:

    • W-LED / Standard LED / General / GB Led

    If, in your words, I can’t trust the ‘CCT,’ and if the iiyama screen is correctly calibrated, I’m still wondering why all the Apple products in the store tend to shift more towards ‘magenta,’ and the certification of many color professionals saying it’s ‘close to perfection’ is puzzling me.

    iiyama specs: https://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/f4d7a73

    In the future, I want to purchase one of these screens from the link below. According to the specifications, it can display 98% of the P3 colors. Should I still use the ‘Standard LED’ option for this monitor? Or will I encounter a significant ‘magenta’ cast because it’s a wide gamut monitor like Macbook Pro 13″?

    DELL U2723QE: https://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/25df2a36

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    #140031

    Vincent
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    As said before Spyder X is innacurate and lack of specific corrections for the different types of current widegamut backlight, but XDR screen shoud look more or less “white”, MAYBE 6700 CCT and close to daylight curve (so they look white).

    So use it as “visual reference” and make a visual match on iyama. Remember to DO NOT USE abs colorimetric LUT3D on that iyama visually matched when simulating D65 colorspaces (sRGB/Rec709)

    #140032

    Vincent
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    Also on a macbook XDR do not use (at least as first try) traditional GPU calibration software. IF you relly want to modify factory white to something else, measure current / native whitepoint then use Apple custom preset to correct white. It will request you xyY coordinates of white and then it will autocorrect to your desired white.
    But using an SpyderX may not be a good idea for that.

    #140035

    violetleaf
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    Remember to DO NOT USE abs colorimetric LUT3D on that iyama visually matched when simulating D65 colorspaces (sRGB/Rec709)

    Why is this?

    #140036

    violetleaf
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    According to the specifications, it can display 98% of the P3 colors. Should I still use the ‘Standard LED’ option for this monitor?

    No, it’s a wide gamut panel and would not use a “Standard LED”. You’d want to use the “W-LED” setting apparently. But better yet, sell that Spyder and get yourself an i1Display

    If, in your words, I can’t trust the ‘CCT,’ and if the iiyama screen is correctly calibrated, I’m still wondering why all the Apple products in the store tend to shift more towards ‘magenta,’ and the certification of many color professionals saying it’s ‘close to perfection’ is puzzling me.

    Like Vincent implies, it’s more likely that the macbook display is accurate to D65 as-is than the iiyama and your iphone 13

    #140037

    AytacFx
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    Thank you for your response, Vincent and Violetleaf

    There isn’t an XDR screen on the Macbook Pro 13″; I only compared these in the store.

    So, are you suggesting that my Iiyama Prolite screen might actually be the one that’s inaccurate, and the screens I saw in the Apple store could be closer to the truth? I’m not sure how accurate it is to say something without seeing it. Did I understand you correctly? (Edit: thank you Violetleaf)

    Would it be a problem for me to continue using the Iiyama this way? As long as I don’t put it next to other screens. After all, doesn’t the human brain adjust its white balance and perceive colors based on the environment it’s in? Am I mistaken about this?

    I don’t expect my MacBook screen and the screen I use for editing photos to be exactly the same.

    I was planning to try DisplayCal again, but unfortunately, I couldn’t run it on the new MacOS 14 version.

    Comparison between Spyder and X-Rite. He is using a Eizo monitor and hi is pretty also happy with SpyderX.

    Please start at 18:20; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wl6ftGpD2W4&list=FLURdrOVDNGPzZuZWZr31S1w&index=3

    If i buy one of these, will it solve my problems with difference panel types?

    Calibrite Display Pro HL (CCDIS3HL)

    https://www.amazon.com/Calibrite-Display-Plus-HL-CCDIS3PLHL/dp/B0C836NB5X?th=1

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by AytacFx.
    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by AytacFx.
    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by AytacFx.
    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by AytacFx.
    #140044

    AytacFx
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    I was also searching for this video; the first 5 minutes are important.

    I could just order a Calibrite Display Pro HL and test it side by side with SpyderX.

    What do you guys think? I’m now just waiting answer from Spyder support.

    PS: If i order it before 31 dec, thet give free 1TB HDD and Colorchecker classic mini 🙂

    #140045

    violetleaf
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    I was also searching for this video; the first 5 minutes are important.

    Interesting, this video states that your Macbook uses a White LED backlight which would correspond to “Standard LED” in Spyder terms – contradicting Spyder support’s statement

    #140046

    AytacFx
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    An interesting point. I think they mean W-LED. In their software, it shows as White Led, but there isn’t an option for W-LED.

    I just calibrated the MacBook with Standard Led, but the magenta hue increased even more. Actually, having a slight magenta tint when looking at this screen alone seems normal. Perhaps, the Iiyama wasn’t properly calibrated from the start. I’m completely disconnected from accuracy now. 🙂

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    #140048

    AytacFx
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    Hmm, so in X-Rite terms, which backlight setting should be used for the IIyama monitor?

    #140049

    Vincent
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    Remember to DO NOT USE abs colorimetric LUT3D on that iyama visually matched when simulating D65 colorspaces (sRGB/Rec709)

    Why is this?

    Because it will undo the visually matched white (which is likely to do not have D65 coordinates by SpyderX) and transform it to numerically match D65 (by SPyder), which has a color cast according to ypu. Use relative colorimetric as the easiest solution (although there are more complex ones explained in the forum, too long to explain again).

    #140050

    Vincent
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    Hmm, so in X-Rite terms, which backlight setting should be used for the IIyama monitor?

    If iiyama is White LED sRGB only “White LED”… BUT some sRGB only displays like those PD from Benq are actually using the “cheap” PFS flavor (almost P3 green) and use primary mixing to get sRGB-like primaries.
    So as an educated guess, “White LED”, but try to check if there is an CCSS i1d3 correction for that iiyama in https://colorimetercorrections.displaycal.net/

    #140051

    Vincent
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    I was also searching for this video; the first 5 minutes are important.

    <iframe width=”474″ height=”267″ loading=”lazy” title=”How to Calibrate any Apple Displays, iMac, Mac Laptop with Calibrite Profilier!” src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/8vj6XuEmQhs?feature=oembed&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share” allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”></iframe>

    I could just order a Calibrite Display Pro HL and test it side by side with SpyderX.

    What do you guys think? I’m now just waiting answer from Spyder support.

    PS: If i order it before 31 dec, thet give free 1TB HDD and Colorchecker classic mini 🙂

    calibrite Profiler lacks of colirimeter corrections for mac, ALL widegamut macs. Also software lies to you. Using PFS phosphor actually uses GB-LED and sleecting GB-LED sctually uses RGB LED. Total garbage. It is not colorimeter’s fault, it’s calibrite app fault. knowing actual EDR equivalence (the ones i wrote above) you can try EDR replacemnt from other EDR spurces like CalMAN or i1Profiler o whatever you want.

    I mean, using ccprofiler or i1Profiler you get partially PFS support (almost P3 flavor) and you can trully use GB-LED if you have one of these old LED widegamuts, and using DisplayCAL/ArgyllCMS/HCFR you get full potential of i1d3 colorimeter form Xrite/calibrite. Just happens that “calibrite profiler” software is a little crap unless some patching is done, out of the scope of this thread.

    Also that guy in the video is sometimes called “Art is wrong” in color forum (like LULA) for several reasons. The funny part is that he ie revealing in the Benq SW series of videos the crap these Benqs SW are even if he does not notice it (hughe a* shifts in grey after calibration).

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by Vincent.
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