The eternal question about SpyderX and the green parasitic hues.

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  • #140723

    SERHII
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    I have two monitors: “Dell U2518D” and “LG 32UN880”. I use SpyderX for their calibration. I’ve encountered some issues, which I’ll mention below, but first let me explain a few more things.

    I’ve noticed that in many similar discussions on this forum, it’s often mentioned that SpyderX should be replaced with X-Rite products. So, before investing in another calibration device, I’d like to hear about others’ experiences.

    The problem is that when I set the target temperature to 6500K, the Dell monitor, after calibration, displays a greenish tint, while the LG seems to have a magenta tint. It seems that the calibration sets the correct temperature but doesn’t account for the tint. This results in the monitors being less consistent in color after calibration than before.

    I’ve found a solution by using the native white point for each monitor and calibrating the other parameters without adjusting the temperature. This yields good results, but only at certain temperatures, such as 7000K and above. However, if I add a third monitor, I doubt this approach would work as effectively.

    Now, if I were to summarize and rephrase all this into questions:

    – Can X-Rite products change the situation by accurately setting the white point without tint, or is this a characteristic of my monitors?
    – If tint issues are not due to the calibration tool but rather the monitors themselves, what specific advantages does X-Rite have over SpyderX? Is it worth switching from one to the other if I’m working with monitors of this caliber?
    – How can I achieve calibrated monitors with white points of 6500K or 5700K? And is it even possible?!

    *I’m using a translator, so maybe not everything is clear, sorry in advance.

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by SERHII.
    • This topic was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by SERHII.

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    #140726

    Old Man
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    Yes, you should get an i1d3 instead. I recommend the calibrite colorchecker display plus.

    Other than that, one possible problem is color temperatures *don’t* account for tint, like you noticed. This is why we don’t use them. We use white points. D65 is probably what you want (technically not a white point either, but lets keep this simple). Maybe there’s a D57 too, I don’t know. Another approach is to say 6,504K *daylight* (D65) or 5,700K *daylight*. That qualifier gets you what you’re looking for. Another important thing is to make sure you’re using the appropriate correction for the display. This is where the spyders are bad.

    An i1d3 might fix your problem, yes.

    Different displays are different, but most can be calibrated fine with an i1d3 and an appropriate correction. I’d absolutely switch.

    Again, with an i1d3, appropriate corrections, and DisplayCAL, you should be able to calibrate pretty much anything you want (except HDR)

    #140730

    SERHII
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    Thank you!

    Among the available options, there is no possibility to purchase the “ColorChecker Display Plus,” but “Pro,” “Studio,” and “Pro OEM Asus ProArt” are available. Of these, “OEM Asus ProArt” seems to be the most attractive option as it is offered in a sealed (new) condition.

    To avoid creating a separate thread, can it be confirmed here whether “OEM Asus ProArt” is compatible with DisplayCal without any limitations other than the lack of support for the original software? Are there any other limitations with such (OEM) versions?

    #140732

    Vincent
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    Thank you!

    Among the available options, there is no possibility to purchase the “ColorChecker Display Plus,” but “Pro,” “Studio,” and “Pro OEM Asus ProArt” are available. Of these, “OEM Asus ProArt” seems to be the most attractive option as it is offered in a sealed (new) condition.

    To avoid creating a separate thread, can it be confirmed here whether “OEM Asus ProArt” is compatible with DisplayCal without any limitations other than the lack of support for the original software? Are there any other limitations with such (OEM) versions?

    Asus i1d3 MAY have a different unlock code, so it MAY not be supported by ArgyllCMS 3.1.0. You’ll need to try one to check. If it does not work ypu’ll have to contact Graeme Gill, ArgyllCMS owner in its mail list.

    #140733

    Vincent
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    First of all make sure you are at least using closet buil in corrections for those displays.
    If uncorrected & OSD set to native gamut RGB primaries are close to sRGB use “White LED / Standard LED” built int mode for spyder. If LG is close to P3, use “Wide LED”.
    Try to calibrate and see if sutiation improved.

    Now, if I were to summarize and rephrase all this into questions:

    – Can X-Rite products change the situation by accurately setting the white point without tint, or is this a characteristic of my monitors?

    You’ll need to use a suitable correction for each display, but Xrite i1d3 is user updateable in a distributed way (CCSS corrections) while spyders don’t have this feature.

    – If tint issues are not due to the calibration tool but rather the monitors themselves, what specific advantages does X-Rite have over SpyderX? Is it worth switching from one to the other if I’m working with monitors of this caliber?

    White point tint after aiming to D65 and properly modifying RGB gains is caused by:
    -inncaurate correction applied to colorimeter
    -low res if spectrophotometer
    -your particular vision not matching CIE 1931 2 degree observer.
    Usually the culprit is the first one.

    – How can I achieve calibrated monitors with white points of 6500K or 5700K? And is it even possible?!

    If monitor has 2 OSD “user” modes, you set differet RGB gains for them, although they may share brightness. Since 5700K is likely to be further away from native white point it will suffer a slight brightness drop.
    If monitor has not 2 OSD modes, choose the more common whitepopint fro every day (usually D65) then WITHOUT modifying RGB gains ask DisplayCAL to calibrate relying on GPU LUT. One or 2 channel max outùt will be limited and contrast will drop, but on 8bit displays @D65 5700K shoudl be close enough to try and check how many unique grey levels you lost by calibrating white point on GPU.

    #140734

    SERHII
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    Thank you to all active participants of the forum!!

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