Got a monitor that's w-led but…

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  A.ces (@a-ces) 3 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #18064

    A.ces (@a-ces)
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    Hi I got a monitor here that’s W-LED but the W-LED spectral correction in my i1d3 pro gives a green tinted, more yellow color temp with a colour gamut of dci-p3 81%, but if I adjust it by eye to be very close to the other monitor which has a 94% DCI panel with the Panasonic correction, the whites look very close, and the color gamut reports a increase to 87.2% dci-p3.

    I have tried all of the spectral profiles that gets downloaded with i1d3 but none of them looks correct, underreporting green etc,s I’m left wondering is what I’m doing really accurate or?

    • This topic was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  A.ces.
    #18067

    Florian Höch (@fhoech)
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    Hi,

    WLED alone is not enough information. There’s two common types of WLED: WLED with yellow phosphor (the most common case, roughly Rec. 709 gamut) and WLED with PFS phosphors (roughly DCI P3 gamut, the “Panasonic VVX…” falls into that category). And then there’s a third possibility, also with PFS phosphors, but roughly AdobeRGB gamut. All of these are included with DisplayCAL (if you choose the installer). Select the one that’s appropriate for your display.

    #18071

    A.ces (@a-ces)
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    That’s the thing none of  the W-LED spectras match close compared  to the display which has a dci-p3 95% using PFS Panasonic, the only way I got it to be very close is by visually matching them.

    I have tried all of those three you mentioned but, they are all underreporting the green value, if I match it the white temp looks overly greenish yellow, etc.

    #18073

    A.ces (@a-ces)
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    Update: using judd voss observer and normal W-LED spectral correction it also looks much closer to the monitor im referencing to, the RGB values using Judd Voss is also much closer to the values i visually matched 1-2 ticks up or down etc.

    x (x)

    #18075

    Vincent (@vincent)
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    Update: using judd voss observer and normal W-LED spectral correction it also looks much closer to the monitor im referencing to, the RGB values using Judd Voss is also much closer to the values i visually matched 1-2 ticks up or down etc.

    x (x)

    No matching correction or correction that it’s close to what it should be (by technology type) but gives somo visual tint in white … I would keep using CIE 1931 2º but instead of aiming at D65 alone, use DisplayCAL visual white point editor with the other monitor you are using as reference.

    There is one correction which stores 4 different samples of W-LED PFS: “PFS_Phosphor_Family_31Jan17.ccss”
    They are slightly diffrent (and hey have smaller gamut) than AdobeRGB+P3 (HP_DreamColor_Z24x_NewPanel), P3 (MacBookProRetina2016) or 95% P3 (Panasonic VVX17P051J00).

    Also it is possible that a “common” WLED sRGB-like display with a bit extended gamut like EA275UHD/EA271Q is close to that % P3 coverage.
    If you reported full display description+model it could be easier to discard backlights.

    #18076

    A.ces (@a-ces)
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    Update: using judd voss observer and normal W-LED spectral correction it also looks much closer to the monitor im referencing to, the RGB values using Judd Voss is also much closer to the values i visually matched 1-2 ticks up or down etc.

    x (x)

    No matching correction or correction that it’s close to what it should be (by technology type) but gives somo visual tint in white … I would keep using CIE 1931 2º but instead of aiming at D65 alone, use DisplayCAL visual white point editor with the other monitor you are using as reference.

    There is one correction which stores 4 different samples of W-LED PFS: “PFS_Phosphor_Family_31Jan17.ccss”
    They are slightly diffrent (and hey have smaller gamut) than AdobeRGB+P3 (HP_DreamColor_Z24x_NewPanel), P3 (MacBookProRetina2016) or 95% P3 (Panasonic VVX17P051J00).

    Also it is possible that a “common” WLED sRGB-like display with a bit extended gamut like EA275UHD/EA271Q is close to that % P3 coverage.
    If you reported full display description+model it could be easier to discard backlights.

    That wouldn’t really help as it’s a rebrand with non disclosed panel but it’s quite a hiqh quality one, no visually noticeable deviation across the panel, but i’m quite sure it’s a W-LED display, if i visually match with the reference monitor the gamut goes up from 71% to 77.2% DCI-P3 using W-LED correction.

    I did try the PFS family, with the 1932 2 observer but it’s severely under-reporting  the Green value, visually juss vodd/shaw & fairchild 1997 with W-LED looks closer, could also be that these observers match my own color sensitivity better.

    x (x)

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  A.ces.
    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  A.ces.
    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  A.ces.
    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  A.ces.
    #18130

    A.ces (@a-ces)
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    EDIT: i managed to get close to  the same white temp as my reference display by visually calibrating, the values reported by the i1d3pro are far off in blue/green but that’s probably normal as there is no spectral correction that fits this monitor.

    x (x)

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