Alienware AW2723DF which correction to use

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  • #139924

    SuspiciousPixel
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    Hi

    I am using DisplayCAL 3.8.9.3 in Windows 10 with an i1DisplayPro coloromiter. I intend to receive my Alienware AW2723DF purchase in a few days time.
    It’s been a while since I last calibrated. Do I select Mode: LCD generic and for Correction: Spectral LCD White LED family (AC, LG, Samsung) for this monitor?

    The panel specs are:
    https://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/648b2dfb

    I have no idea if this is wide gammut display but for IPS do I select
    Correction: LCD PFS Phosphor WLED IPS, 94% P3 (Panasonic…..)?

    I don’t plan on using HDR mode since it’s probably not going to be very good and has only 16 edge lit zones. QD-OLED 1000 nits plus is probably more suited for HDR content so I plan on using it for gaming content only with DCIP3 color space and whitelevel of 120 or 140 cd/m2.

    Thank you

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    #139927

    violetleaf
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    It is a wide color gamut display, and PFS Phosphor white LED is a very typical backlight in today’s WCG displays. Have you tried searching the displaycal colorimeter corrections database for your display?

    https://colorimetercorrections.displaycal.net/?get=1&type=ccss&display=*&technology=LCD&html=1

    As an aside, how many games are even made with colors outside sRGB gamut?

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by violetleaf.
    #139929

    SuspiciousPixel
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    It is a wide color gamut display, and PFS Phosphor white LED is a very typical backlight in today’s WCG displays. Have you tried searching the displaycal colorimeter corrections database for your display?

    https://colorimetercorrections.displaycal.net/?get=1&type=ccss&display=*&technology=LCD&html=1

    As an aside, how many games are even made with colors outside sRGB gamut?

    I did research before hand and saw one for it. Normally (although it was years ago) I would chose the Argyll CMS corrections as I had no idea if the user corrections were reliable.
    I don’t think games are made outside the SRGB gamut. D3 is for watching movies iirc.
    But since you determined it’s a WCG display should I go with the correction in the link you provided or which of the Argyll PFS Phosphor white LED in the list is suitable for WCG?

    Thank you

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    #139931

    SuspiciousPixel
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    Coorection * Games with HDR10 support will use DCI-P3 when HDR is enabled otherwise it’s sRGB

    #139932

    JohnD
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    I’d be willing to bet it’s a WLED PFS Phosphor

    A graph of the community ccss for the AW2723 looks like the inbuild PFS Phosphor correction – see both attached graphs.

    You’re probably on the right track not using the community correction, since it’s done with a i1Pro2, which only has 10nm resolution. I didn’t get anywhere close to acceptable results using my i1Pro2 and had to get someone with a JETI 1511 to take some readings to be able to create a good quality correction for my monitor.

    Looking at the two graphs, the amplitude of the blue light component when looking at the graph from the  i1Pro2 is around 95% of the red vs about 65% on the inbuilt correction, although I know the i1Pro2 overreads the blue light amplitude, since when I compared the readings my i1Pro2 took of my monitor vs the ones the JETI took, the i1Pro2 read blue light amplitudes 20% – 25% greater than the JETI did.

    So if you assume that 95% in actuality is around 70% to 75% of the red instead, there’s less of an obvious difference.

    Still, I surmise that you might get a slight luminance mismatch and a whitepoint that’s a bit off – possibly a bit too red, although I’m just guessing , so I’d be curious to know if that actually turns out to be the case or not. That’s what happened to me when I used a correction for a CG319x on my CS2740, which has similar relative differences.

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    #139935

    JohnD
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    Rant mode on: why the hell these vendors of wide-gamut mid to high end monitors don’t include at the very least a spectral power distribution graph along with the documentation of their monitors, or even better, a set of readings to download, completely escapes me.

    After all, many of these vendors are “factory calibrating” their monitors, so they already have these SPDs, and probably with a reference instrument too. Even Eizo doesn’t do it or even distribute decent corrections with their software. These vendors are just putting check marks on their spec sheets instead of making monitors than can actually be calibrated satisfactorily without spending tons of money to either buy a reference instrument or hire someone to come and do some readings with a reference instrument.

    #139936

    violetleaf
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    I did research before hand and saw one for it. Normally (although it was years ago) I would chose the Argyll CMS corrections as I had no idea if the user corrections were reliable.I don’t think games are made outside the SRGB gamut. D3 is for watching movies iirc.
    But since you determined it’s a WCG display should I go with the correction in the link you provided or which of the Argyll PFS Phosphor white LED in the list is suitable for WCG?

    Thank you

    You can view the spectral graphs of the community uploaded spectral data and compare them yourself. There’s a button right next to that drop-down for this purpose. You can also view chromaticity coordinate information. The corrections bundled with Displaycal are typically taken with precision instruments, the ones community uploaded tend to be generated by the value spectrometer king, the i1pro 2 spectrophotometer.

    IMO, the Panasonic VVX1… PFS WLED looks like a good match, as JohnD noted.

    Coorection * Games with HDR10 support will use DCI-P3 when HDR is enabled otherwise it’s sRGB

    I believe HDR10 (and 10+) use Rec 2020 primaries. That doesn’t necessarily mean the game assets were created outside the sRGB gamut. Based on my Googling it seems that it’s very difficult to deduce what color space a game was designed for, just that it supports “HDR”

    #139937

    violetleaf
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    since it’s done with a i1Pro2, which only has 10nm resolution

    ArgyllCMS has a “High Resolution mode” for these devices that improves this to 3.3nm, at least in theory.

    #139960

    SuspiciousPixel
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    Do these results look okay?

    Also the monitor had RGB offset setting, is it good practise to use that alonside the standard Gain RGB to refine the initial calibration for getting the RGB and luminence 120cdm3 as close to the target numbers that Displaycal sets?

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    #139987

    JohnD
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    Yes, although that’s not unexpected. You’d likely get similar results if you were using the wrong correction.

    The key to determining whether it’s ok is visual. Does the whitepoint look right? Is it close to the whitepoint of the factory calibrated profile, or is it a mile away.

    TFTCentral measured the factory whitepoint on the model they tested at 6296K, which implies that you should see some difference between your calibrated profile and the factory profile, but it should be pretty subtle rather than in-your-face.

    #139988

    SuspiciousPixel
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    The key to determining whether it’s ok is visual. Does the whitepoint look right? Is it close to the whitepoint of the factory calibrated profile, or is it a mile away.

    TFTCentral measured the factory whitepoint on the model they tested at 6296K, which implies that you should see some difference between your calibrated profile and the factory profile, but it should be pretty subtle rather than in-your-face.

    That’s a good shout actually. The monitor has a sRGB creator mode which I can use to compare.

    I’ve not found a review from TFT central but RTINGS has one and their creator mode read 6,949 K for color temp.

    https://www.rtings.com/monitor/reviews/dell/alienware-aw2723df

    Currently White color does look a bit dark for my liking but I guess I can just increase the brightness without affecting color accuracy?

    Thank you

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