Picking the right Correction setting for Dell S3220DGF

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  • #33695

    jomama
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    Hi, I’m new here. Just bought a new monitor, Dell S3220DGF, and want to calibrate it. I have a i1Display Pro. I’m just trying to figure out which correction to choose from the list of available options. It’s DCI-P3 native VA panel monitor. So these are the questions I have:

    1. Which correction profile should I pick?  I think that it is the “LCD PFS Phosphor WLED family” but maybe some of you here have already gone down this path and will have a different opinion.
    2. In the settings window on top, which option should I pick–sRGB or Gamma 2.2 or something else?
    3. The default contrast on the monitor is 100%.  A couple of other sites (rtings and Tom’s Hardware) have done their own calibrations, and they’re reporting contrast values of 75 and 73, respectively. I don’t know how they reached those values. Should I just go ahead and set contrast to a similar value or is there a way to do it more interactively within DisplayCAL?
    4. I have Auto HDR shut off on the monitor so when I’m running a cal I assume it’s generating SDR colors. What about HDR then? How does HDR mode get calibrated then?

    These are many questions and they may seem newbish, but any guidance that any of you could provide would be really appreciated.

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    #33698

    jomama
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    Should this be in  the “Help and Support” category?

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by jomama.
    #33715

    Vincent
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    1- yes, or one from community for that display (make sure 3nm and check that it was nor made from a sRGB emulated preset, you can see it in CCSS info button)
    2- 2.2. low contrast display
    3- Usually you should not modify “OSD contrast” value, just brightness and RGB gains for whitepoint… but that model may have somethig different , IDNK.
    4-It is not HDR mnitor, it can accept HDR signal and translate it to equivalent SDR RGB signal within your display gamut, applying some clipping or tone mapping when signal is out of gamut. Usually this is written in a simple LUT3D or equivalent in firmware and you cannot modify it.
    Best choice is to do not use HDR mode at all, rely on software translators like madVR where you have more control of that HDR signal to SDR signal translation.

    #33760

    jomama
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    Hi Vincent. Thank you for your reply. A few follow-up questions:

    1. How can I get hold of a correction method developed in the community? I noticed that by clicking the “Online” button on the DisplayCAL OSD brings up a list of user-generated corrections. Is that what you meant? But what do you mean by “3nm“?
    2. This is a VA Panel, so it should have high contrast ratio. Can you please explain why you’re saying this is a low contrast display?
    3. Yes. I also have a Dell U-series monitor that I use for photography. I learned by calibrating that monitor that you generally leave the OSD contrast value to its default. But this one pegs out at a 100% by default. (Both rtings and Tom’s Hardware set theirs to 70-73% for their calibration. I don’t know if they did that intuitively or by running some deeper level calibrations.)
    4. The monitor spec says “10-bit (8-bit+FRC) / DCI-P3, DisplayHDR 400, HDR10.” I am genuinely curious to know why you think it’s not a HDR monitor. Is that because it’s not a true 10-bit panel? I know display device manufacturers make all sorts of claims about their TV/Monitors that are often misleading, HDR being one of them.

    Thank you for your help.

    #33761

    Vincent
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    Hi Vincent. Thank you for your reply. A few follow-up questions:

    1. How can I get hold of a correction method developed in the community? I noticed that by clicking the “Online” button on the DisplayCAL OSD brings up a list of user-generated corrections. Is that what you meant? But what do you mean by “3nm“?

    Resolution. PFS need it. See an spectral power distribution (CCSS content) of a PFS phoshor at 3nm and 10nm and 1nm. Xrite spectros for graphic arts read at 10nm with other software and may imporve to 3nm using argyll.

    1. This is a VA Panel, so it should have high contrast ratio. Can you please explain why you’re saying this is a low contrast display?

    Because it is low contrast. When in HDR backlight must be set to maximum (even in a FALD if that zone is active) so 400nit -> 0.4nit black in IPS, 0.1 black in 4000:1 VA. HDR is about dynamic range, not about “more brightness”.
    Without thounsands of FALD zones with a density per inch equal to miniled macbook XDR, these “HDR” displays are faeke HDR displays. Just a signal tranlator do SDR content panel can show.

    1. Yes. I also have a Dell U-series monitor that I use for photography. I learned by calibrating that monitor that you generally leave the OSD contrast value to its default. But this one pegs out at a 100% by default. (Both rtings and Tom’s Hardware set theirs to 70-73% for their calibration. I don’t know if they did that intuitively or by running some deeper level calibrations.)

    Test its behavior on non color managed near black and near white test in lagom lcd test. Non color managed => open images in MS PAINT

    1. The monitor spec says “10-bit (8-bit+FRC) / DCI-P3, DisplayHDR 400, HDR10.” I am genuinely curious to know why you think it’s not a HDR monitor. Is that because it’s not a true 10-bit panel? I know display device manufacturers make all sorts of claims about their TV/Monitors that are often misleading, HDR being one of them.

    Becaue it cannot show high dynamic range. It can show P3 content on a 2000:1? 3000:1 contrast window fioxed by brightness. Explained above. It is not HDR. It can “read” HDR signal and translate to SDR capabilities of panel (2000-3000:1 contrast window)

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by Vincent.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by Vincent.
    #33779

    jomama
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    Thank you, Vincent! You clearly have a deep knowledge in this area. I appreciate your help. I went ahead and ran a calibration earlier today. It seemed to go well. I’ll keep playing around with it until I’m fully satisfied.

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