Eizo Built in calibration VS Spyder 5 Pro mismatch

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  • #33636

    Antoine Dorseuil
    Participant
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    Hi,

    I’m having troubles calibrating a Davinci Resolve workstation, it has two basic srgb LG screens and a wide gamut EIZO cg248-4k. The 3 screens rely on the windows hardware color managment (no decklink card).

    I tried making an icc profile for each monitor but the result weren’t good (eizo not matching other screens) so the calibration workflow I’ve choosen is the following:

    Creating a 3DLut for the EIZO following this video tutorial  https://youtu.be/DDUPY1HQkSU

    Then visually match the two lg screens with the eizo, so I can get my workstation operationnal quickly, until I find a way to match them by calibrating and making ICC profiles.

    The thing is, to calibrate the eizo I have to do a calibration with the built-in probe first and the software colornavigator. The gamma and black seem ok but the white point doesn’t match with the spyder 5 result. When I follow the spyder 5 indication to get the whitepoint I get an obvious green cast on the Eizo.

    Since I can’t buy a better probe right now, I thought of this technique: I would rely on the eizo’s built in calibration and then when I do the lut with display cal I just change the target whitepoint to trick the Spyder 5 so it measures the same whitepoint as the eizo’s probe.

    If you have any advice on my situation I would be very happy to hear them !

    Have a nice day

    #33643

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Since I can’t buy a better probe right now, I thought of this technique: I would rely on the eizo’s built in calibration and then when I do the lut with display cal I just change the target whitepoint to trick the Spyder 5 so it measures the same whitepoint as the eizo’s probe.

    Not needed, use a relative whitepoint rendering intent instead of absolute, it will preserve display profile whitepoint. (Als o you must be using relative whitepoint for LUT3D right now, otherwise the cast will be there).

    Also since you are using a highly inaccurate device, display profile itself is not accurate so computed LUT3D transformation won’t be accurate. Without access to an i1d3 for proper profiling you may even create a LUT3D from the extreme idealized ICC profile computed by Color Navigator (it’s matrix type, idealized behavior, but at least it’s “real”, made from somehow  accurate measurements). If Color Navigator profile had some issues like PCS D50 as white or something like that, use relative whitepoint rendering intents.

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by Vincent.
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