ColorMunki Display Colorimeter Correction and Spectral Correction?

Home Forums Help and Support ColorMunki Display Colorimeter Correction and Spectral Correction?

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #25033

    Jeff Harmon
    Participant
    • Offline

    This software and this forum is filled with information on a topic I know very little about.  I have been through the website instructions on how to use DisplayCal to calibrate my monitor using the ColorMunki Display but I am not totally clear on what I should choose in the Display & Instrument screen in the Correction dropdown after I have done Tools > Correction > Import colorimeter corrections for other display profiling software.

    I am working on a calibration of a BenQ PD2700Q and a ViewSonic VX3211-4K-MHD.  Based on the panels in those displays it seems like I should I choose “Spectral: LCD White LED Family (AC, LG, Samsung)” in that Correction drop down.  Is that correct, or should I choose None or Auto because I imported the Colorimeter correction from my XRite software?

    i1Display Studio on Amazon  
    Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

    #25036

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    I am working on a calibration of a BenQ PD2700Q and a ViewSonic VX3211-4K-MHD.  Based on the panels in those displays it seems like I should I choose “Spectral: LCD White LED Family (AC, LG, Samsung)” in that Correction drop down.  Is that correct, or should I choose None or Auto because I imported the Colorimeter correction from my XRite software?

    “Spectral: LCD White LED Family (AC, LG, Samsung)” = common WLED sRGB monitor, yes, use it.

    Bundled corrections in Xrite are text translations (CCSS) of Xrite EDRs binary files. They are the same. Also DisplayCAL’s bundled corrections include some CCSS not available in common xrite software.

    #25068

    AstralStorm
    Participant
    • Offline

    The BenQ is a white LED screen.

    The Viewsonic is not a White LED screen. It’s a different screen. Try one of the corrections for RG, here’s hoping they used the same LEDs.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by AstralStorm.
    #25075

    AstralStorm
    Participant
    • Offline

    Short version is that high% NTSC is about the same as high% Adobe RGB means it’s one of the GB-r or RG screens, of which there are a few in the database. High DCI-P3 percentage unfortuntately does not tell that much, it might be either one of these or the different RG LED set as used in e.g. XV273K, or perhaps QLED. (And of course could be one of the OLEDs.)

    #25077

    AstralStorm
    Participant
    • Offline

    It seems that LG and Samsung wide gamut LCD panels tend to use this alternative LED setup with different green and blue LEDs, closer to DCI-P3 than Adobe RGB primaries. For those, try the Quantum LED setting. (Even if the display is not QLED, it will have similar primaries.)

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by AstralStorm.
    #25079

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Actually you are right about viewsonic, I did not google it and assumed user’s claims about them being equal. Benq PD are typical WLED sRGB, that viewsonic is not.

    #25083

    Jeff Harmon
    Participant
    • Offline

    I wasn’t trying to assert those were the profiles to use, it was part of my question.  It seemed as though they were, but I wasn’t fully sure.

    Let me make sure I am understanding correctly.  According to diplayspecifications.com The Viewsonic VX3211-4K-MHD uses a UA, W-LED screen that has 95% NTSC which is about the same as high Adobe RGB and means I should give the “LCD GB-r-LED” correction profile a go?

    Also, I have been reading at other sites the recommendation to not move the color temperature away from native during the Interactive adjustment phase and just have DisplayCal address that in the profile it creates.  Is that good advice?

    #25085

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    I wasn’t trying to assert those were the profiles to use, it was part of my question.  It seemed as though they were, but I wasn’t fully sure.

    Let me make sure I am understanding correctly.  According to diplayspecifications.com The Viewsonic VX3211-4K-MHD uses a UA, W-LED screen that has 95% NTSC which is about the same as high Adobe RGB and means I should give the “LCD GB-r-LED” correction profile a go?

    Unless you find a review that reports actual spectral distribution, numerically or in a 2D plot it is unknown. “LCD GB-r-LED” is just a hint.

    Also, I have been reading at other sites the recommendation to not move the color temperature away from native during the Interactive adjustment phase and just have DisplayCal address that in the profile it creates.  Is that good advice?

    I would say no. It’s better to fix whitepint in display because you loose less unique grey levels in video card LUT correction.
    It is true that if you do nothing because it’s locked like in a laptop or some All-in-one computers, or some OSD modes with locked controls, DisplayCAL will do it for you but using video card LUTs. If you can, fix it with OSD, what you cannot fix vs target whitepoint will be corrected in GPU.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Log in or Register

Display Calibration and Characterization powered by ArgyllCMS