ASUS ProArt Calibration White Balance Issue

Home Forums Help and Support ASUS ProArt Calibration White Balance Issue

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #35506

    Ben Cerauli
    Participant
    • Offline

    I recently purchased an Asus ProArt display that has the ability to load a calibration directly onto the hardware chip of the monitor, however you have to use Asus’ own calibration software in order to do so.

    I tried calibrating using this method for the first time today, and then used displaycal to verify the calibration inside of DaVinci Resolve. What’s odd is that the results were spot on, except for the white balance which measured a flat 6000. instead of the 6500k that I calibrated for.

    Even weirder is that to my eyes the white balance seems visually accurate, is there a reason why the white balance would measure incorrectly? In the “verification” tab I was sure to check the “use simulation profile as display profile” box since the calibration is hardware loaded onto the monitor. However, the verification page wouldn’t let me run a verification unless I had a previous display profile selected at the very top. Is there a different way to verify without any alterations from displaycal that I’m missing?

    #35508

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    Asus software lacked of proper spectral corrections for i1d3 with the RGB OLED as only exception… so it measures wrongly and calibrates wrongly (bigger or smaller error depending on firmware data and things you can’t control)

    If you measure with DisplayCAL you should measure using proper correction too.. otherwise readings won’t be accurate (same bigger or smaler error as above). Search colorimeter database, look for CCSS, not CCMX. The newer ones are a mix of QLED or WLED PFS.

    #35509

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    If you are using other devices like Spyder readings are inaccurate.

    If you are using an Xrite spectro Asus software will be using 10nm resolution whie Displaycal can measure at 3nm, so for whitepoint DisplayCAL results are more accurate… but that 6500 vs 6000 does not fit this scenario.

    Also, correlated color temperature is a totally useless and misleading way to address a whitepoint. Read & learn about that You need 2 coordinates to address color of a whitepoint.

    #35510

    Ben Cerauli
    Participant
    • Offline

    Got it, thanks so much for your response.

    In that case, what would best practice be for calibrating the monitor in displaycal be? Since the monitor is relatively new I haven’t been able to find a matching correction profile yet, should I use one made on a similar monitor, or should I use the built in WLED PSF correction? The monitor is a PA32UCG with a mini-led IPS panel.

    Additionally, which mode should I be calibrating the monitor in? It is best to calibrate the standard mode for Rec709 or should I calibrate in the Rec709 mode on the monitor?

    And lastly, I’ve noticed some odd behavior when setting the white balance of the monitor using the interactive adjustment at the beginning. If I adjust the RGB controls on the monitor to a correct white balance, then only the brightest white is accurate and the body of the monitor will be much too warm, should I just disregard the interactive what’re balance adjustment?

    #35511

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    PA32UGG looks like a QLED backlight (it does not matter leds size, just their light):

    https://colorimetercorrections.displaycal.net/hash/fd19086a6d5489684b3bd55e482e1c1a/ASUSTek%20COMPUTER%20INC%20PA32UCG%20%28i1%20Pro%202%29.ccss

    There is no QLED backlight support in Xrite  or Asus software.

    If you know which EDR is being used in Asus software you may try to forge a new EDR with the same headers but QLED spectral data. Search in this forum for a thread about Eizo CS2731 by Midas. You situation is more difficult because since there is no base EDR to copy you’ll have to interpolate 3nm to 1nm, only after that you can replace data.

    Also if you know which wrong EDR is used in Asus software, then you should try it to verify calibration with Displaycal using the same correction (if no available by default you can convert EDR to CCSS with argyll’s oeminst): check whitepoint, contrast and grey range (RGB + gray balance). Why? because if Asus calibration fails here too that means that Asus software is unable to calibrate properly even if it has the good correction.
    If that happens… there is no point using that faulty HW calibration. You can pay a Colourspace license and try HW calivration with them or you can forget Asus HW calibration and use LeDoge’s LUT3D calibration runing on shaders which is visually equivalent to HW calibration thanks to dither, or Resolve’s software LUT3D support.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Vincent.
    #35513

    Ben Cerauli
    Participant
    • Offline

    Understood, I removed Asus’s hw calibration software and am attempting to calibrate using displaycal again, I’ll stick to loading the lut in resolve. Thank you for all of the info!

    Hopefully the stock Quantum Dot correction in displaycal will give me good results?

    #35514

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline
    #35515

    Ben Cerauli
    Participant
    • Offline

    Sorry for the confusion, I made a typo in my earlier post. I have the PA32UCR, not the UCG. I don’t see a community correction for the PA32UCR.

    Since these monitors are so similar, will the UCG correction profile work well on the UCR? They’re both quantum dot panels.

    #35516

    Vincent
    Participant
    • Offline

    They’re both quantum dot panels.

    IDNK if UCR is QLED. If it is QLED it will work but check primaries in CCSS (specplot or DisplayCAL CCSS info) and in monitor.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Log in or Register

Display Calibration and Characterization powered by ArgyllCMS